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      LINC00852 Regulates Cell Proliferation, Invasion, Migration and Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Via the miR-625/E2F1 Axis

      Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Hepatocellular carcinoma

          Hepatocellular carcinoma appears frequently in patients with cirrhosis. Surveillance by biannual ultrasound is recommended for such patients because it allows diagnosis at an early stage, when effective therapies are feasible. The best candidates for resection are patients with a solitary tumour and preserved liver function. Liver transplantation benefits patients who are not good candidates for surgical resection, and the best candidates are those within Milan criteria (solitary tumour ≤5 cm or up to three nodules ≤3 cm). Image-guided ablation is the most frequently used therapeutic strategy, but its efficacy is limited by the size of the tumour and its localisation. Chemoembolisation has survival benefit in asymptomatic patients with multifocal disease without vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread. Finally, sorafenib, lenvatinib, which is non-inferior to sorafenib, and regorafenib increase survival and are the standard treatments in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. This Seminar summarises the scientific evidence that supports the current recommendations for clinical practice, and discusses the areas in which more research is needed.
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            Long Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Pathways.

            Genome-wide cancer mutation analyses are revealing an extensive landscape of functional mutations within the noncoding genome, with profound effects on the expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). While the exquisite regulation of lncRNA transcription can provide signals of malignant transformation, we now understand that lncRNAs drive many important cancer phenotypes through their interactions with other cellular macromolecules including DNA, protein, and RNA. Recent advancements in surveying lncRNA molecular mechanisms are now providing the tools to functionally annotate these cancer-associated transcripts, making these molecules attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in the fight against cancer.
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              Non-coding RNAs in Development and Disease: Background, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Approaches.

              Advances in RNA-sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of thousands of non-coding transcripts with unknown function. There are several types of non-coding linear RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNA) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), as well as circular RNAs (circRNA) consisting of a closed continuous loop. This review guides the reader through important aspects of non-coding RNA biology. This includes their biogenesis, mode of actions, physiological function, as well as their role in the disease context (such as in cancer or the cardiovascular system). We specifically focus on non-coding RNAs as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering
                Cel. Mol. Bioeng.
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1865-5025
                1865-5033
                April 2022
                December 03 2021
                April 2022
                : 15
                : 2
                : 207-217
                Article
                10.1007/s12195-021-00714-8
                35401844
                9cb14165-010a-407d-b0b4-8403d0c748c1
                © 2022

                https://www.springer.com/tdm

                https://www.springer.com/tdm

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