44
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Kawasaki Disease.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and children. If not treated early with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, 1 in 5 children develop coronary artery aneurysms; this risk is reduced 5-fold if intravenous immunoglobulin is administered within 10 days of fever onset. Coronary artery aneurysms evolve dynamically over time, usually reaching a peak dimension by 6 weeks after illness onset. Almost all the morbidity and mortality occur in patients with giant aneurysms. Risk of myocardial infarction from coronary artery thrombosis is greatest in the first 2 years after illness onset. However, stenosis and occlusion progress over years. Indeed, Kawasaki disease is no longer a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome presenting in young adults. Both coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous intervention have been used to treat Kawasaki disease patients who develop myocardial ischemia as a consequence of coronary artery aneurysms and stenosis.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.
          Journal of the American College of Cardiology
          1558-3597
          0735-1097
          Apr 12 2016
          : 67
          : 14
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Cardiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jane.newburger@cardio.chboston.org.
          [2 ] Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
          [3 ] Department of Pediatrics, Rady Children's Hospital, University of California-San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla, California.
          Article
          S0735-1097(16)00713-0
          10.1016/j.jacc.2015.12.073
          27056781
          9f0144bd-ead1-4d65-97d7-11671f751be4
          Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
          History

          aneurysm,coronary aneurysm,coronary thrombosis,immunoglobulin,intravenous,mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome,myocardial infarction

          Comments

          Comment on this article