Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Adiponectin Stimulates Exosome Release to Enhance Mesenchymal Stem-Cell-Driven Therapy of Heart Failure in Mice

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are cultured adult stem cells that originally reside in virtually all tissues, and the gain of MSCs by transplantation has become the leading form of cell therapy in various diseases. However, there is limited knowledge on the alteration of its efficacy by factors in recipients. Here, we report that the cardioprotective properties of intravenously injected MSCs in a mouse model of pressure-overload heart failure largely depend on circulating adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted factor. The injected MSCs exert their function through exosomes, extracellular vesicles of endosome origin. Adiponectin stimulated exosome biogenesis and secretion through binding to T-cadherin, a unique glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cadherin, on MSCs. A pharmacological or adenovirus-mediated genetic increase in plasma adiponectin enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs. Our findings provide novel insights into the importance of adiponectin in mesenchymal-progenitor-mediated organ protections.

          Graphical Abstract

          Abstract

          Mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) therapies are emergently under development for various diseases such as heart failure and also acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evoked by COVID-19 infections. Nakamura et al. uncovered the importance of adiponectin in the circulation and T-cadherin in human adipose-derived MSCs to enhance exosome synthesis reading to treat a heart failure model.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 41

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Hypoadiponectinemia in obesity and type 2 diabetes: close association with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia.

           K. Hotta,  C Weyer,  S. Tanaka (2001)
          Plasma concentrations of adiponectin, a novel adipose-specific protein with putative antiatherogenic and antiinflammatory effects, were found to be decreased in Japanese individuals with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, conditions commonly associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. To further characterize the relationship between adiponectinemia and adiposity, insulin sensitivity, insulinemia, and glucose tolerance, we measured plasma adiponectin concentrations, body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity (M, hyperinsulinemic clamp), and glucose tolerance (75-g oral glucose tolerance test) in 23 Caucasians and 121 Pima Indians, a population with a high propensity for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Plasma adiponectin concentration was negatively correlated with percent body fat (r = -0.43), waist-to-thigh ratio (r = -0.46), fasting plasma insulin concentration (r = -0.63), and 2-h glucose concentration (r = -0.38), and positively correlated with M (r = 0.59) (all P < 0.001); all relations were evident in both ethnic groups. In a multivariate analysis, fasting plasma insulin concentration, M, and waist-to-thigh ratio, but not percent body fat or 2-h glucose concentration, were significant independent determinates of adiponectinemia, explaining 47% of the variance (r(2) = 0.47). Differences in adiponectinemia between Pima Indians and Caucasians (7.2 +/- 2.6 vs. 10.2 +/- 4.3 microg/ml, P < 0.0001) and between Pima Indians with normal, impaired, and diabetic glucose tolerance (7.5 +/- 2.7, 6.1 +/- 2.0, 5.5 +/- 1.6 microg/ml, P < 0.0001) remained significant after adjustment for adiposity, but not after additional adjustment for M or fasting insulin concentration. These results confirm that obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with low plasma adiponectin concentrations in different ethnic groups and indicate that the degree of hypoadiponectinemia is more closely related to the degree of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia than to the degree of adiposity and glucose intolerance.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Two steps forward, one step back.

            Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is poised to establish a new clinical paradigm; however, recent trials have produced mixed results. Although MSC were originally considered to treat connective tissue defects, preclinical studies revealed potent immunomodulatory properties that prompted the use of MSC to treat numerous inflammatory conditions. Unfortunately, although clinical trials have met safety endpoints, efficacy has not been demonstrated. We believe the challenge to demonstrate efficacy can be attributed in part to an incomplete understanding of the fate of MSC following infusion. Here, we highlight the clinical status of MSC therapy and discuss the importance of cell-tracking techniques, which have advanced our understanding of the fate and function of systemically infused MSC and might improve clinical application. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Relative roles of direct regeneration versus paracrine effects of human cardiosphere-derived cells transplanted into infarcted mice.

              Multiple biological mechanisms contribute to the efficacy of cardiac cell therapy. Most prominent among these are direct heart muscle and blood vessel regeneration from transplanted cells, as opposed to paracrine enhancement of tissue preservation and/or recruitment of endogenous repair. Human cardiac progenitor cells, cultured as cardiospheres (CSps) or as CSp-derived cells (CDCs), have been shown to be capable of direct cardiac regeneration in vivo. Here we characterized paracrine effects in CDC transplantation and investigated their relative importance versus direct differentiation of surviving transplanted cells. In vitro, many growth factors were found in media conditioned by human adult CSps and CDCs; CDC-conditioned media exerted antiapoptotic effects on neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, and proangiogenic effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo, human CDCs secreted vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor 1 when transplanted into the same SCID mouse model of acute myocardial infarction where they were previously shown to improve function and to produce tissue regeneration. Injection of CDCs in the peri-infarct zone increased the expression of Akt, decreased apoptotic rate and caspase 3 level, and increased capillary density, indicating overall higher tissue resilience. Based on the number of human-specific cells relative to overall increases in capillary density and myocardial viability, direct differentiation quantitatively accounted for 20% to 50% of the observed effects. Together with their spontaneous commitment to cardiac and angiogenic differentiation, transplanted CDCs serve as "role models," recruiting endogenous regeneration and improving tissue resistance to ischemic stress. The contribution of the role model effect rivals or exceeds that of direct regeneration.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Mol Ther
                Mol. Ther
                Molecular Therapy
                The Author(s).
                1525-0016
                1525-0024
                10 July 2020
                10 July 2020
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Metabolic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
                [2 ]Department of Adipose Management, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
                [3 ]ROHTO Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. Osaka, Japan
                [4 ]Department of Advanced Stem Cell Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
                [5 ]Department of Biopharmaceutics and Drug Metabolism, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
                [6 ]Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
                [7 ]Medical Center for Translational Research, Osaka University Hospital, Osaka, Japan
                [8 ]Department of Metabolism and Atherosclerosis, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author: Shunbun Kita, PhD, Department of Metabolic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. shunkita@ 123456endmet.med.osaka-u.ac.jp
                Article
                S1525-0016(20)30316-6
                10.1016/j.ymthe.2020.06.026
                7351027
                32652045
                © 2020 The Author(s)

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article