0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Survey of reasons why women utilize honey therapeutically, and reasons for not utilizing honey

      a , , a , b

      Heliyon

      Elsevier

      Food science, Honey, Preferences, Medical use

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          There are various situations when honey can be reasonably used in cases of disease, for example radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. We investigated the underlying reasons why women eat honey and why some would refuse to use honey even if it was reasonable to do so. In order to answer these questions, we asked 201 women to answer various questions related to the consumption of honey. We found that the preferred routes of administration change when honey is used as a remedy. Most importantly, we identified “organic beekeeping” and a second factor related to the perception of honey regarding price, handling and health by principal component analysis as relevant regarding the refusal of the use of honey even when scientifically reasonable. If honey is to become an acceptable treatment option, it seems important to address all aspects of ethical beekeeping in the production of medicinal bee products.

          Abstract

          Food Science, Honey, Preferences, Medical use.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The influence of parental practices on child promotive and preventive food consumption behaviors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

          Background The family is an important social context where children learn and adopt eating behaviors. Specifically, parents play the role of health promoters, role models, and educators in the lives of children, influencing their food cognitions and choices. This study attempts to systematically review empirical studies examining the influence of parents on child food consumption behavior in two contexts: one promotive in nature (e.g., healthy food), and the other preventive in nature (e.g., unhealthy food). Methods From a total of 6,448 titles extracted from Web of Science, ERIC, PsycINFO and PubMED, seventy eight studies met the inclusion criteria for a systematic review, while thirty seven articles contained requisite statistical information for meta-analysis. The parental variables extracted include active guidance/education, restrictive guidance/rule-making, availability, accessibility, modeling, pressure to eat, rewarding food consumption, rewarding with verbal praise, and using food as reward. The food consumption behaviors examined include fruits and vegetables consumption, sugar-sweetened beverages, and snack consumption. Results Results indicate that availability (Healthy: r = .24, p < .001; Unhealthy: r = .34, p < .001) and parental modeling effects (Healthy: r = .32, p < .001; Unhealthy: r = .35, p < .001) show the strongest associations with both healthy and unhealthy food consumption. In addition, the efficacy of some parenting practices might be dependent on the food consumption context and the age of the child. For healthy foods, active guidance/education might be more effective (r = .15, p < .001). For unhealthy foods, restrictive guidance/rule-making might be more effective (r = −.11, p < .01). For children 7 and older, restrictive guidance/rule-making could be more effective in preventing unhealthy eating (r = − .20, p < .05). For children 6 and younger, rewarding with verbal praise can be more effective in promoting healthy eating (r = .26, p < .001) and in preventing unhealthy eating (r = − .08, p < .01). Conclusions This study illustrates that a number of parental behaviors are strong correlates of child food consumption behavior. More importantly, this study highlights 3 main areas in parental influence of child food consumption that are understudied: (1) active guidance/education, (2) psychosocial mediators, and (3) moderating influence of general parenting styles. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12966-017-0501-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Economically Motivated Adulteration (EMA) of Food: Common Characteristics of EMA Incidents

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Antibiotic, Pesticide, and Microbial Contaminants of Honey: Human Health Hazards

              Agricultural contamination with pesticides and antibiotics is a challenging problem that needs to be fully addressed. Bee products, such as honey, are widely consumed as food and medicine and their contamination may carry serious health hazards. Honey and other bee products are polluted by pesticides, heavy metals, bacteria and radioactive materials. Pesticide residues cause genetic mutations and cellular degradation and presence of antibiotics might increase resistant human or animal's pathogens. Many cases of infant botulisms have been attributed to contaminated honey. Honey may be very toxic when produced from certain plants. Ingestion of honey without knowing its source and safety might be problematic. Honey should be labeled to explore its origin, composition, and clear statement that it is free from contaminants. Honey that is not subjected for analysis and sterilization should not be used in infants, and should not be applied to wounds or used for medicinal purposes. This article reviews the extent and health impact of honey contamination and stresses on the introduction of a strict monitoring system and validation of acceptable minimal concentrations of pollutants or identifying maximum residue limits for bee products, in particular, honey.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Heliyon
                Heliyon
                Heliyon
                Elsevier
                2405-8440
                15 October 2020
                October 2020
                15 October 2020
                : 6
                : 10
                Affiliations
                [a ]Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg-Kehl, Ebertplatz 12, 77654 Offenburg, Germany
                [b ]Practice for Gynecology, Konrad-Adenauer-Straße 2, 35781 Weilburg, Germany
                Author notes
                Article
                S2405-8440(20)32074-0 e05231
                10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e05231
                7569232
                © 2020 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                Categories
                Research Article

                food science, honey, preferences, medical use

                Comments

                Comment on this article