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      Lithium Metal Battery Using LiFe 0.5Mn 0.5PO 4 Olivine Cathode and Pyrrolidinium-Based Ionic Liquid Electrolyte

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      ACS Omega

      American Chemical Society

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          Abstract

          Ionic liquids (ILs) represent the most suitable electrolyte media for a safe application in high-energy lithium metal batteries because of their remarkable thermal stability promoted by the room-temperature molten salt nature. In this work, we exploit this favorable characteristic by combining a pyrrolidinium-based electrolyte and a LiFe 0.5Mn 0.5PO 4 mixed olivine cathode in a lithium metal cell. The IL solution, namely N-butyl- N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pyr 14TFSI) dissolving LiTFSI, is designed as viscous electrolyte, particularly suited for cells operating at temperatures higher than 40 °C, as demonstrated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The olivine electrode, characterized by remarkable structural stability at high temperature, is studied in the lithium metal cell using the Pyr 14TFSI–LiTFSI medium above the room temperature. The Li/Pyr 14TFSI–LiTFSI/LiFe 0.5Mn 0.5PO 4 cell delivers a capacity of about 100 mA h g –1 through two voltage plateaus at about 3.5 and 4.1 V, ascribed to the iron and manganese redox reaction, respectively. The cycling stability, satisfactory levels of the energy density, and a relevant safety content suggest the cell studied herein as a viable energy storage system for future applications.

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          Most cited references 34

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          Ionic-liquid materials for the electrochemical challenges of the future.

          Ionic liquids are room-temperature molten salts, composed mostly of organic ions that may undergo almost unlimited structural variations. This review covers the newest aspects of ionic liquids in applications where their ion conductivity is exploited; as electrochemical solvents for metal/semiconductor electrodeposition, and as batteries and fuel cells where conventional media, organic solvents (in batteries) or water (in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells), fail. Biology and biomimetic processes in ionic liquids are also discussed. In these decidedly different materials, some enzymes show activity that is not exhibited in more traditional systems, creating huge potential for bioinspired catalysis and biofuel cells. Our goal in this review is to survey the recent key developments and issues within ionic-liquid research in these areas. As well as informing materials scientists, we hope to generate interest in the wider community and encourage others to make use of ionic liquids in tackling scientific challenges.
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            Review of selected electrode–solution interactions which determine the performance of Li and Li ion batteries

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              Ionic liquids as electrolytes

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                ACS Omega
                ACS Omega
                ao
                acsodf
                ACS Omega
                American Chemical Society
                2470-1343
                01 August 2018
                31 August 2018
                : 3
                : 8
                : 8583-8588
                Affiliations
                Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and National Interuniversity Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM) University of Ferrara Research Unit, University of Ferrara , Via Fossato di Mortara, 17, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
                Author notes
                Article
                10.1021/acsomega.8b01328
                6644812
                Copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society

                This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

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                ao8b01328
                ao-2018-013285

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