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      Parasitoids of the eucalyptus gall wasp Leptocybe invasa (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in China Translated title: Parasitoïdes de l’agent de la galle de l’eucalyptus Leptocybe invasa (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) en Chine

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          Abstract

          Leptocybe invasa Fisher & La Salle (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) is an invasive pest in Eucalyptus plantations throughout the world. Potential biological control agents for L. invasa were investigated in the Fujian, Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, Jiangxi, and Sichuan provinces of China, where Eucalyptus spp. have been severely damaged by the eucalyptus gall wasp. Three hymenopteran parasitoids of L. invasa were identified: Quadrastichus mendeli Kim & La Salle (Eulophidae), Aprostocetus causalis La Salle & Wu (Eulophidae), and Megastigmus viggianii Narendran & Sureshan (Torymidae); M. viggianii is newly recorded in China. The percentages of parasitization by Q. mendeli, A. causalis, and M. viggianii were 2.96%–19.53%, 2.30%–26.38%, and 24.93%, respectively. The longevity and body length of females were significantly greater than for males in A. causalis and M. viggianii. No males of Q. mendeli were found in China. These parasitoids could be used as biological agents for L. invasa in China.

          Translated abstract

          Leptocybe invasa Fisher & La Salle (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) est un ravageur envahissant dans les plantations d’eucalyptus dans le monde. Les agents potentiels de lutte biologique contre L. invasa ont été étudiés en Chine dans les provinces de Fujian, Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, Jiangxi et Sichuan, où les Eucalyptus spp. ont été gravement endommagés par la galle de l’eucalyptus. Trois hyménoptères parasitoïdes de L. invasa ont été identifiés :  Quadrastichus mendeli Kim & La Salle (Eulophidae), Aprostocetus causalis La Salle et Wu (Eulophidae) et Megastigmus viggianii Narendran & Sureshan (Torymidae) ; M. viggianii est une nouvelle mention pour la Chine. Le pourcentage de parasitisme par Q. mendeli, A. causalis et M. viggianii étaient 2.96 %–19.53 %, 2.30 %–26.38 % et 24.93 %, respectivement. La longévité et la longueur du corps étaient significativement plus élevées chez les femelles que chez les mâles pour A. causalis et M. viggianii. Aucun mâle de Q. mendeli n’a été trouvé en Chine. Ces parasitoïdes pourraient être utilisés comme agents biologiques contre L. invasa en Chine.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Genetic Diversity of the Invasive Gall Wasp Leptocybe invasa (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and of its Rickettsia Endosymbiont, and Associated Sex-Ratio Differences

          The blue-gum chalcid Leptocybe invasa Fisher & LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gall wasp pest of Eucalyptus species, likely native to Australia. Over the past 15 years it has invaded 39 countries on all continents where eucalypts are grown. The worldwide invasion of the blue gum chalcid was attributed to a single thelytokous morphospecies formally described in 2004. Subsequently, however, males have been recorded in several countries and the sex ratio of field populations has been found to be highly variable in different areas. In order to find an explanation for such sex ratio differences, populations of L. invasa from a broad geographical area were screened for the symbionts currently known as reproductive manipulators, and both wasps and symbionts were genetically characterized using multiple genes. Molecular analyses suggested that L. invasa is in fact a complex of two cryptic species involved in the rapid and efficient spread of the wasp, the first recovered from the Mediterranean region and South America, the latter from China. All screened specimens were infected by endosymbiotic bacteria belonging to the genus Rickettsia. Two closely related Rickettsia strains were found, each infecting one of the two putative cryptic species of L. invasa and associated with different average sex ratios. Rickettsia were found to be localized in the female reproductive tissues and transovarially transmitted, suggesting a possible role of Rickettsia as the causal agent of thelytokous parthenogenesis in L. invasa. Implications for the variation of sex ratio and for the management of L. invasa are discussed.
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            First report of the Eucalyptus gall wasp, Ophelimus maskelli (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), an invasive pest on Eucalyptus, from the Western Hemisphere.

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              Two new Aprostocetus species (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), fortuitous parasitoids of invasive eulophid gall inducers (Tetrastichinae) on Eucalyptus and Erythrina

               MM Yang,  YC Lin,  YJ Wu (2014)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Parasite
                Parasite
                parasite
                Parasite
                EDP Sciences
                1252-607X
                1776-1042
                2016
                21 December 2016
                : 23
                : ( publisher-idID: parasite/2016/01 )
                Affiliations
                [1 ] College of Agriculture, Guangxi University Nanning 530004 Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region PR China
                [2 ] College of Forestry, Guangxi University Nanning 530004 Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region PR China
                [3 ] Department of Guangxi Forestry Pest Management Nanning 530028 Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region PR China
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: luwenlwen@ 123456163.com
                Article
                parasite160063 10.1051/parasite/2016071
                10.1051/parasite/2016071
                5178379
                28000590
                © X.-L. Zheng et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Tables: 2, Equations: 0, References: 35, Pages: 7
                Categories
                Research Article

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