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      COPD phenotypes on computed tomography and its correlation with selected lung function variables in severe patients

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          Abstract

          Background

          Computed tomography (CT) phenotypic characterization helps in understanding the clinical diversity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but its clinical relevance and its relationship with functional features are not clarified. Volumetric capnography (VC) uses the principle of gas washout and analyzes the pattern of CO 2 elimination as a function of expired volume. The main variables analyzed were end-tidal concentration of carbon dioxide (ETCO 2), Slope of phase 2 (Slp2), and Slope of phase 3 (Slp3) of capnogram, the curve which represents the total amount of CO 2 eliminated by the lungs during each breath.

          Objective

          To investigate, in a group of patients with severe COPD, if the phenotypic analysis by CT could identify different subsets of patients, and if there was an association of CT findings and functional variables.

          Subjects and methods

          Sixty-five patients with COPD Gold III–IV were admitted for clinical evaluation, high-resolution CT, and functional evaluation (spirometry, 6-minute walk test [6MWT], and VC). The presence and profusion of tomography findings were evaluated, and later, the patients were identified as having emphysema (EMP) or airway disease (AWD) phenotype. EMP and AWD groups were compared; tomography findings scores were evaluated versus spirometric, 6MWT, and VC variables.

          Results

          Bronchiectasis was found in 33.8% and peribronchial thickening in 69.2% of the 65 patients. Structural findings of airways had no significant correlation with spirometric variables. Air trapping and EMP were strongly correlated with VC variables, but in opposite directions. There was some overlap between the EMP and AWD groups, but EMP patients had signicantly lower body mass index, worse obstruction, and shorter walked distance on 6MWT. Concerning VC, EMP patients had signicantly lower ETCO2, Slp2 and Slp3. Increases in Slp3 characterize heterogeneous involvement of the distal air spaces, as in AWD.

          Conclusion

          Visual assessment and phenotyping of CT in COPD patients is feasible and may help identify functional and clinically different subsets of patients. VC may provide useful information about the heterogeneous involvement of lung structures in COPD.

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          Most cited references 28

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          Computed tomographic measurements of airway dimensions and emphysema in smokers. Correlation with lung function.

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the presence of airflow obstruction caused by emphysema or airway narrowing, or both. Low attenuation areas (LAA) on computed tomography (CT) have been shown to represent macroscopic or microscopic emphysema, or both. However CT has not been used to quantify the airway abnormalities in smokers with or without airflow obstruction. In this study, we used CT to evaluate both emphysema and airway wall thickening in 114 smokers. The CT measurements revealed that a decreased FEV(1) (%predicted) is associated with an increase of airway wall area and an increase of emphysema. Although both airway wall thickening and emphysema (LAA) correlated with measurements of lung function, stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the combination of airway and emphysema measurements improved the estimate of pulmonary function test abnormalities. We conclude that both CT measurements of airway dimensions and emphysema are useful and complementary in the evaluation of the lung of smokers.
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            Effects of smoking cessation on lung function and airway inflammation in smokers with asthma.

            Active smoking in asthma is associated with worsening of symptoms, accelerated decline in lung function, and impaired response to corticosteroids. To examine the short-term effects of smoking cessation on lung function, airway inflammation, and corticosteroid responsiveness in smokers with asthma. Smokers with asthma were given the option to quit or continue smoking. Both groups underwent spirometry and induced sputum at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 wk. Cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to topical beclometasone, airway response to oral prednisolone, and sensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes to corticosteroids were measured before smoking cessation and at 6 wk. Of 32 subjects recruited, 11 opted to continue smoking (smoking control group). Of 21 subjects who opted for smoking cessation, 10 quit smoking for 6 wk (quit group). In the comparison of quitters with smokers at 6 wk, the mean (confidence interval [CI]) difference in FEV(1) was 407 ml (21, 793), p = 0.040, and the proportion of sputum neutrophils was reduced by 29 (51, 8), p = 0.039. Total cutaneous vasoconstrictor response score to topical beclometasone improved after smoking cessation with a mean (CI) difference of 3.56 (0.84, 6.28), p = 0.042, between quitters and smokers. There was no change in airway corticosteroid responses after smoking cessation. By 6 wk after smoking cessation, subjects who quit smoking had achieved considerable improvement in lung function and a fall in sputum neutrophil count compared with subjects who continued to smoke. These findings highlight the importance of smoking cessation in asthma.
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              A combined pulmonary-radiology workshop for visual evaluation of COPD: study design, chest CT findings and concordance with quantitative evaluation.

              The purposes of this study were: to describe chest CT findings in normal non-smoking controls and cigarette smokers with and without COPD; to compare the prevalence of CT abnormalities with severity of COPD; and to evaluate concordance between visual and quantitative chest CT (QCT) scoring. Volumetric inspiratory and expiratory CT scans of 294 subjects, including normal non-smokers, smokers without COPD, and smokers with GOLD Stage I-IV COPD, were scored at a multi-reader workshop using a standardized worksheet. There were 58 observers (33 pulmonologists, 25 radiologists); each scan was scored by 9-11 observers. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistic. Median score of visual observations was compared with QCT measurements. Interobserver agreement was moderate for the presence or absence of emphysema and for the presence of panlobular emphysema; fair for the presence of centrilobular, paraseptal, and bullous emphysema subtypes and for the presence of bronchial wall thickening; and poor for gas trapping, centrilobular nodularity, mosaic attenuation, and bronchial dilation. Agreement was similar for radiologists and pulmonologists. The prevalence on CT readings of most abnormalities (e.g. emphysema, bronchial wall thickening, mosaic attenuation, expiratory gas trapping) increased significantly with greater COPD severity, while the prevalence of centrilobular nodularity decreased. Concordances between visual scoring and quantitative scoring of emphysema, gas trapping and airway wall thickening were 75%, 87% and 65%, respectively. Despite substantial inter-observer variation, visual assessment of chest CT scans in cigarette smokers provides information regarding lung disease severity; visual scoring may be complementary to quantitative evaluation.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2016
                16 March 2016
                : 11
                : 503-513
                Affiliations
                Pneumology Service, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Mônica Corso Pereira, Pneumology Service, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, São Paulo 13083970, Brazil, Email moncorso@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                copd-11-503
                10.2147/COPD.S90638
                4801153
                27042039
                © 2016 da Silva et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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