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      How do individuals expect to be viewed by members of lower status groups? Content and implications of meta-stereotypes.

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      Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          Three studies demonstrated that meta-stereotypes held by members of dominant groups about how their group is viewed by a lower status group have important implications for intergroup relations. Study 1 confirmed that White Canadians hold a shared negative meta-stereotype about how they are viewed by Aboriginal Canadians; Studies 2 and 3 extended these results to people's beliefs about an individual out-group member's impressions of them. Feeling stereotyped was associated with negative emotions about intergroup interaction as well as decreases in current self-esteem and self-concept clarity. The perceptions of low- and high-prejudiced persons (LPs and HPs) diverged in a manner consistent with their distinct personal values and group identifications. LPs held a more negative meta-stereotype than did HPs. However, in a one-on-one interaction, HPs sensed that they were stereotyped, whereas LPs felt that they conveyed a counterstereotypical impression.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
          Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
          American Psychological Association (APA)
          1939-1315
          0022-3514
          1998
          1998
          : 75
          : 4
          : 917-937
          Article
          10.1037/0022-3514.75.4.917
          9825528
          b5a1a847-903c-4537-a6cb-f9c9645fdf4c
          © 1998
          History

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