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      Association of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphism with Lipid Profiles in Children and Adolescents with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes mellitus

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          Abstract

          We attempted to clarify the association between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism and the other predictive factors for macroangiopathy in children and adolescents with uncomplicated insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Sixty-three patients were divided into 3 groups according to the ACE genotypes. The lipid profiles were evaluated according to ACE genotypes. The level of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) in the II genotype was significantly lower than that in groups with the D allele. Lp(a) significantly correlated with apo B/apo A-I (p < 0.001, r = 0.63) and atherogenic index (AI = (total cholesterol – high-density lipoprotein cholesterol)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; p = 0.004, r = 0.36). We suggest that the D allele may affect the level of Lp(a) and the other lipid profiles in IDDM.

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          Most cited references 2

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          A prospective evaluation of an angiotensin-converting-enzyme gene polymorphism and the risk of ischemic heart disease.

          In a previous study, men with a history of myocardial infarction were found to have an increased prevalence of homozygosity for the deletional allele (D) of the angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) gene. The D allele is associated with higher levels of ACE, which may predispose a person to ischemic heart disease. We investigated the association between the ACE genotype and the incidence of myocardial infarction, as well as other manifestations of ischemic heart disease, in a large, prospective cohort of U.S. male physicians. In the Physicians' Health Study, ischemic heart disease as defined by angina, coronary revascularization, or myocardial infarction developed in 1250 men by 1992. They were matched with 2340 controls according to age and smoking history. Zygosity for the deletion-insertion (D-I) polymorphism of the ACE gene was determined by an assay based on the polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed for both matched pairs and unmatched samples, with adjustment for the effects of known or suspected risk factors by conditional and nonconditional logistic regression, respectively. The ACE genotype was not associated with the occurrence of either ischemic heart disease or myocardial infarction. The adjusted relative risk associated with the D allele was 1.07 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.19; P = 0.24) for ischemic heart disease and 1.05 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.89 to 1.25; P = 0.56) for myocardial infarction, if an additive mode of inheritance is assumed. Additional analyses assuming dominant and recessive effects of the D allele also failed to show any association, as did the examination of low-risk subgroups. In a large, prospectively followed population of U.S. male physicians, the presence of the D allele of the ACE gene conferred no appreciable increase in the risk of ischemic heart disease or myocardial infarction.
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            Liprotein(a) Phenotypes in Japanese Children: A Cohort Study

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              Author and article information

              Journal
              HRE
              Horm Res Paediatr
              10.1159/issn.1663-2818
              Hormone Research in Paediatrics
              S. Karger AG
              1663-2818
              1663-2826
              1999
              April 1999
              27 August 1999
              : 51
              : 4
              : 201-204
              Affiliations
              Department of Pediatrics, Yamanashi Medical University, Yamanashi, Japan
              Article
              23358 Horm Res 1999;51:201–204
              10.1159/000023358
              10474023
              © 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel

              Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

              Page count
              Figures: 2, Tables: 1, References: 17, Pages: 4
              Categories
              Original Paper

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