Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Density functional studies on the exchange interaction of a dinuclear Gd(iii)–Cu(ii) complex: method assessment, magnetic coupling mechanism and magneto-structural correlations

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Density functional calculations have been performed on a [Gd(iii)Cu(ii)] complex [L(1)CuGd(O(2)CCF(3))(3)(C(2)H(5)OH)(2)] () (where L(1) is N,N'-bis(3-ethoxy-salicylidene)-1,2-diamino-2-methylpropanato) with an aim of assessing a suitable functional within the DFT formalism to understand the mechanism of magnetic coupling and also to develop magneto-structural correlations. Encouraging results have been obtained in our studies where the application of B3LYP on the crystal structure of yields a ferromagnetic J value of -5.8 cm(-1) which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of -4.42 cm(-1) (H = JS(Gd).S(Cu)). After testing varieties of functional for the method assessment we recommend the use of B3LYP with a combination of an effective core potential basis set. For all electron basis sets the relativistic effects should be incorporated either via the Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) or zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) methods. A breakdown approach has been adopted where the calculations on several model complexes of have been performed. Their wave functions have been analysed thereafter (MO and NBO analysis) in order to gain some insight into the coupling mechanism. The results suggest, unambiguously, that the empty Gd(iii) 5d orbitals have a prominent role on the magnetic coupling. These 5d orbitals gain partial occupancy via Cu(ii) charge transfer as well as from the Gd(iii) 4f orbitals. A competing 4f-3d interaction associated with the symmetry of the complex has also been observed. The general mechanism hence incorporates both contributions and sets forth rather a prevailing mechanism for the 3d-4f coupling. The magneto-structural correlations reveal that there is no unique parameter which the J values are strongly correlated with, but an exponential relation to the J value found for the O-Cu-O-Gd dihedral angle parameter is the most credible correlation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 4

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Basis set exchange: a community database for computational sciences.

          Basis sets are some of the most important input data for computational models in the chemistry, materials, biology, and other science domains that utilize computational quantum mechanics methods. Providing a shared, Web-accessible environment where researchers can not only download basis sets in their required format but browse the data, contribute new basis sets, and ultimately curate and manage the data as a community will facilitate growth of this resource and encourage sharing both data and knowledge. We describe the Basis Set Exchange (BSE), a Web portal that provides advanced browsing and download capabilities, facilities for contributing basis set data, and an environment that incorporates tools to foster development and interaction of communities. The BSE leverages and enables continued development of the basis set library originally assembled at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The role of databases in support of computational chemistry calculations

             David Feller (1996)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Single-Molecule Magnets

              Magnets are widely used in a large number of applications, and their market is larger than that of semiconductors. Information storage is certainly one of the most important uses of magnets, and the lower limit to the size of the memory elements is provided by the superparamagnetic size, below which information cannot be permanently stored because the magnetization freely fluctuates. This occurs at room temperature for particles in the range of 10–100 nm, owing to the nature of the material. However, even smaller particles can in principle be used either by working at lower temperatures or by taking advantage of the onset of quantum size effects, which can make nanomagnets candidates for the construction of quantum computers.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                ICHBD9
                Dalton Transactions
                Dalton Trans.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1477-9226
                1477-9234
                2009
                2009
                : 17
                : 3153
                Article
                10.1039/b817540c
                19421617
                © 2009
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=b817540c

                Comments

                Comment on this article