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      Proteomic and Metabolomic Characterization of COVID-19 Patient Sera

      research-article
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      Cell
      Elsevier Inc.

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          Summary

          Early detection and effective treatment of severe COVID-19 patients remain major challenges. Here, we performed proteomic and metabolomic profiling of sera from 46 COVID-19 and 53 control individuals. We then trained a machine learning model using proteomic and metabolomic measurements from a training cohort of 18 non-severe and 13 severe patients. The model was validated using ten independent patients, seven of which were correctly classified. Targeted proteomics and metabolomics assays were employed to further validate this molecular classifier in a second test cohort of 19 new COVID-19 patients, leading to 16 correct assignments. We identified molecular changes in the sera of COVID-19 patients compared to other groups implicating dysregulation of macrophage, platelet degranulation and complement system pathways, and massive metabolic suppression. This study revealed characteristic protein and metabolite changes in the sera of severe COVID-19 patients, which might be used in selection of potential blood biomarkers for severity evaluation.

          Highlights

          • 93 proteins show differential expression in severe COVID-19 patient sera

          • 204 metabolites in COVID-19 patient sera correlate with disease severity

          • A model composed of 29 serum factors shows patient stratification potential

          • Pathway analysis highlights metabolic and immune dysregulation in COVID-19 patients

          Abstract

          Proteomic and metabolomic analysis of COVID-19 sera identifies differentially expressed factors that correlate with disease severity and highlight dysregulation of multiple immune and metabolic components in clinically severe patients.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          Cell
          Cell
          Cell
          Elsevier Inc.
          0092-8674
          1097-4172
          28 May 2020
          28 May 2020
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, 150 Ximen Street, Linhai 317000, Zhejiang Province, China;
          [2 ]Key Laboratory of Structural Biology of Zhejiang Province, School of Life Sciences, Westlake University, 18 Shilongshan Road, Hangzhou 310024, Zhejiang Province, China;
          [3 ]Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Westlake Institute for Advanced Study, 18 Shilongshan Road, Hangzhou 310024, Zhejiang Province, China;
          [4 ]Calibra Lab at DIAN Diagnostics, 329 Jinpeng Street, Hangzhou 310030, Zhejiang Province, China;
          Author notes
          Article
          S0092-8674(20)30627-9
          10.1016/j.cell.2020.05.032
          7254001
          32492406
          d3784ab0-d2ba-44cd-b6e4-1128fb784511
          © 2020 Elsevier Inc.

          Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

          History
          : 3 April 2020
          : 27 April 2020
          : 18 May 2020
          Categories
          Article

          Cell biology
          Cell biology

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