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      Persistent Post-Transplant Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism despite 23 Years of Excellent Renal Allograft Function

      a , b

      Nephron

      S. Karger AG

      Hyperparathyroidism, Parathyroidectomy, Dialysis, Transplantation, Autografting

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          Abstract

          Hyperparathyroidism is a common problem for patients on renal replacement therapy programs. Many long-term dialysis patients require parathyroidectomy while on dialysis. Some patients, however, despite severe renal osteodystrophy, are transplanted, and in these a large proportion show a slow resolution of bony problems, in the context of the removal of the uremic stimulus to abnormal bone metabolism. A proportion of these patients become hypercalcaemic after renal transplantation, sometimes with symptoms. There is not a consensus on how these patients should be managed, with opinions varying from early parathyroidectomy to later parathyroidectomy and to conservative treatment. We present the case of a lady who underwent 23 years of conservative management of her post-transplant hyperparathyroidism. She was hypercalcaemic for almost all of that period, despite excellent renal transplant function. Finally, after 23 years she underwent surgical parathyroidectomy with autografting with prompt sustained resolution of her symptomatic hypercalcaemia.

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          Most cited references 2

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          Persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation.

          The persistence of secondary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation is frequent and often complicated by overt hypercalcemia. Recent investigations have shown an effect of the different vitamin D receptor (VDR) genotypes on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion in both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The aims of this study were (i) to assess whether persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation is characterized by any change in calcium-controlled PTH secretion, and (ii) whether different VDR allelic distributions might play any role on this setting. Eighty-one cadaveric renal transplantation recipients, followed-up for at least 12 months, were checked for PTH, other primary metabolic and clinical variables, and VDR B/b alleles (BsmI). In 22 of these the following parameters were evaluated: (a) kinetics parameters of the Ca-PTH relation curve; (b) vertebral mineral density; (c) calcitriol serum levels; (d) PTH-related peptide serum levels; and (e) urinary hydroxyproline. According to the stabilised PTH levels (reached by the third month), the patients were divided in two groups: group A (N = 40, PTH 80 pg/ml). Group B differed from group A in that patients had higher PTH levels at the time of transplantation, were older in age, and spent more time on dialysis. Group B had increased maximal and minimal PTH levels, and higher set-point levels than Group A. The patients with the BB pattern of VDR genotype were characterized by the lowest PTH levels both at time of transplantation and after stabilization, and lower set point values than patients with Bb and bb patterns. Our study suggests that (i) the severity of pre-existing secondary hyperparathyroidism is the main factor determining its persistence after renal transplantation, (ii) persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by an autonomous pattern of PTH secretion, (iii) the VDR BB genotype seems to be related to lower PTH levels.
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            Acute hyperparathyroidism with systemic calcinosis. Report of a case.

            A patient with a huge mediastinal parathyroid adenoma had an acute hypercalcemic crisis. The patient exemplifies the many pitfalls in diagnosis and management of this unusual complication. Postoperatively the patient further developed severe calciphylaxis with calcinosis cutis and systemic and pulmonary calcinosis, a most rare condition.
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              Author and article information

              Journal
              NEF
              Nephron
              10.1159/issn.1660-8151
              Nephron
              S. Karger AG
              1660-8151
              2235-3186
              2001
              2001
              24 August 2001
              : 89
              : 1
              : 105-107
              Affiliations
              aRenal Unit, Guy’s Hospital, and bDepartment of Surgery, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London, UK
              Article
              46051 Nephron 2001;89:105–107
              10.1159/000046051
              11528240
              © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

              Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

              Page count
              References: 13, Pages: 3
              Product
              Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46051
              Categories
              Short Communication

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