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      The impact of building height on urban thermal environment in summer: A case study of Chinese megacities

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      PLoS ONE
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          Abstract

          The quantitative relationship between the spatial variation of building’s height and the associated land surface temperature (LST) change in six Chinese megacities is investigated in this paper. The six cities involved are Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Chongqing, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen. Based on both remote sensing and building footprint data, we retrieved the LST using a single-channel (SC) algorithm and evaluate the heating/cooling effect caused by building-height difference via correlation analysis. The results show that the spatial distribution of high-rise buildings is mainly concentrated in the center business districts, riverside zones, and newly built-up areas of the six megacities. In the urban area, the number and the floor-area ratio of high to super high-rise buildings (>24m) account for over 5% and 4.74%, respectively. Being highly urbanized cities, most of urban areas in the six megacities are associated with high LST. Ninety-nine percent of the city areas of Shanghai, Beijing, Chongqing, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Tianjin are covered by the LST in the range of 30.2~67.8°C, 34.8~50.4°C, 25.3~48.3°C, 29.9~47.2°C, 27.4~43.4°C, and 33.0~48.0°C, respectively. Building’s height and LST have a negative logarithmic correlation with the correlation coefficients ranging from -0.701 to -0.853. In the building’s height within range of 0~66m, the LST will decrease significantly with the increase of building’s height. This indicates that the increase of building’s height will bring a significant cooling effect in this height range. When the building’s height exceeds 66m, its effect on LST will be greatly weakened. This is due to the influence of building shadows, local wind disturbances, and the layout of buildings.

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          Automated Water Extraction Index: A new technique for surface water mapping using Landsat imagery

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            Urbanization and global environmental change: local effects of urban warming

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              Impacts of landscape structure on surface urban heat islands: A case study of Shanghai, China

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: SoftwareRole: ValidationRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS One
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                22 April 2021
                2021
                : 16
                : 4
                : e0247786
                Affiliations
                [1 ] School of History and Geography, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou, Fujian, China
                [2 ] College of Environment and Resources, Institute of Remote Sensing Information Engineering, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing of Soil Erosion and Disaster Prevention, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China
                Northeastern University (Shenyang China), CHINA
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-20-37993
                10.1371/journal.pone.0247786
                8062157
                33887759
                da884cfb-496c-43c8-a62a-78f857a29cf3
                © 2021 Wang, Xu

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                History
                : 2 December 2020
                : 16 February 2021
                Page count
                Figures: 7, Tables: 3, Pages: 15
                Funding
                Funded by: Fujian Provincial Innovation Strategy Research Project
                Award ID: 2020R0155
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Principal Foundation of Minnan Normal University
                Award ID: KJ19013
                Award Recipient :
                This research was supported by Fujian Provincial Innovation Strategy Research Project urban Grant 2020R0155, Principal Foundation of Minnan Normal University urban Grant KJ19013. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Terrestrial Environments
                Urban Environments
                Earth Sciences
                Geography
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Urban Areas
                Social Sciences
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Urban Areas
                Earth Sciences
                Geography
                Geographic Areas
                Urban Areas
                Physical Sciences
                Materials Science
                Material Properties
                Surface Properties
                Surface Temperature
                Earth Sciences
                Geography
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Cities
                Social Sciences
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Cities
                Earth Sciences
                Geography
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Urbanization
                Social Sciences
                Human Geography
                Urban Geography
                Urbanization
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Ecology
                Urban Ecology
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Ecology
                Urban Ecology
                Engineering and Technology
                Remote Sensing
                Physical Sciences
                Mathematics
                Applied Mathematics
                Algorithms
                Research and Analysis Methods
                Simulation and Modeling
                Algorithms
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                All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting information files.

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