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      Mechanisms for the prevention of marine bioinvasions for better biosecurity

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      Marine Pollution Bulletin

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Biosecurity management allows countries to meet a number of international obligations and provides some protection from potential degradation of environmental, economic, social and cultural values. Ocean governance relies on the precepts of ecologically sustainable development to manage the multiple uses in the coastal zone. The increasing reliance on aquaculture to provide food security and economic development has led to an increase in the use of non-native target species grown as food sources. Increased economic activity has led to shifting trade patterns and increased efficiencies in vessels with the resulting increase in the number of introduced marine species via ballast water and hull fouling. Herein we review the different marine biosecurity strategies and legislation that have been implemented internationally and locally that aid in preventing and managing introduced marine species, with some attention to Australia and New Zealand as examples. Typical tools being used include quarantine, Import Health Standards, voluntary cleaning guidelines, and risk assessment, all of which aim to prevent introductions.

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          Most cited references 31

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          Ecological roulette: the global transport of nonindigenous marine organisms.

          Ocean-going ships carry, as ballast, seawater that is taken on in port and released at subsequent ports of call. Plankton samples from Japanese ballast water released in Oregon contained 367 taxa. Most taxa with a planktonic phase in their life cycle were found in ballast water, as were all major marine habitat and trophic groups. Transport of entire coastal planktonic assemblages across oceanic barriers to similar habitats renders bays, estuaries, and inland waters among the most threatened ecosystems in the world. Presence of taxonomically difficult or inconspicuous taxa in these samples suggests that ballast water invasions are already pervasive.
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            Global Invasions of Marine and Estuarine Habitats by Non-Indigenous Species: Mechanisms, Extent, and Consequences

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              The Sustainable Biosphere Initiative: An Ecological Research Agenda: A Report from the Ecological Society of America

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Marine Pollution Bulletin
                Marine Pollution Bulletin
                Elsevier BV
                0025326X
                January 2007
                January 2007
                : 55
                : 7-9
                : 395-401
                Article
                10.1016/j.marpolbul.2007.01.005
                17379259
                © 2007

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