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      Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Layer Graphene

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          Abstract

          We report the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a suspended single-layer graphene. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity in the range approximately (4.84+/-0.44)x10(3) to (5.30+/-0.48)x10(3) W/mK were extracted for a single-layer graphene from the dependence of the Raman G peak frequency on the excitation laser power and independently measured G peak temperature coefficient. The extremely high value of the thermal conductivity suggests that graphene can outperform carbon nanotubes in heat conduction. The superb thermal conduction property of graphene is beneficial for the proposed electronic applications and establishes graphene as an excellent material for thermal management.

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          Electric Field Effect in Atomically Thin Carbon Films

          We describe monocrystalline graphitic films, which are a few atoms thick but are nonetheless stable under ambient conditions, metallic, and of remarkably high quality. The films are found to be a two-dimensional semimetal with a tiny overlap between valence and conductance bands, and they exhibit a strong ambipolar electric field effect such that electrons and holes in concentrations up to 10 13 per square centimeter and with room-temperature mobilities of ∼10,000 square centimeters per volt-second can be induced by applying gate voltage.
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            The rise of graphene.

            Graphene is a rapidly rising star on the horizon of materials science and condensed-matter physics. This strictly two-dimensional material exhibits exceptionally high crystal and electronic quality, and, despite its short history, has already revealed a cornucopia of new physics and potential applications, which are briefly discussed here. Whereas one can be certain of the realness of applications only when commercial products appear, graphene no longer requires any further proof of its importance in terms of fundamental physics. Owing to its unusual electronic spectrum, graphene has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of 'relativistic' condensed-matter physics, where quantum relativistic phenomena, some of which are unobservable in high-energy physics, can now be mimicked and tested in table-top experiments. More generally, graphene represents a conceptually new class of materials that are only one atom thick, and, on this basis, offers new inroads into low-dimensional physics that has never ceased to surprise and continues to provide a fertile ground for applications.
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              Quantum Spin Hall Effect in Graphene

              We study the effects of spin orbit interactions on the low energy electronic structure of a single plane of graphene. We find that in an experimentally accessible low temperature regime the symmetry allowed spin orbit potential converts graphene from an ideal two-dimensional semimetallic state to a quantum spin Hall insulator. This novel electronic state of matter is gapped in the bulk and supports the transport of spin and charge in gapless edge states that propagate at the sample boundaries. The edge states are nonchiral, but they are insensitive to disorder because their directionality is correlated with spin. The spin and charge conductances in these edge states are calculated and the effects of temperature, chemical potential, Rashba coupling, disorder, and symmetry breaking fields are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nano Letters
                Nano Lett.
                American Chemical Society (ACS)
                1530-6984
                1530-6992
                March 01 2008
                February 20 2008
                March 01 2008
                : 8
                : 3
                : 902-907
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California−Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California−Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California−Riverside, Riverside, California 92521
                Article
                10.1021/nl0731872
                18284217
                e1146baa-8b38-4274-8bf1-3d5528be2a35
                © 2008
                History

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