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      Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression: Replication and Exploration of Differential Relapse Prevention Effects.

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      Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          Recovered recurrently depressed patients were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU plus mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Replicating previous findings, MBCT reduced relapse from 78% to 36% in 55 patients with 3 or more previous episodes; but in 18 patients with only 2 (recent) episodes corresponding figures were 20% and 50%. MBCT was most effective in preventing relapses not preceded by life events. Relapses were more often associated with significant life events in the 2-episode group. This group also reported less childhood adversity and later first depression onset than the 3-or-more-episode group, suggesting that these groups represented distinct populations. MBCT is an effective and efficient way to prevent relapse/recurrence in recovered depressed patients with 3 or more previous episodes.

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          Most cited references20

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          Responses to depression and their effects on the duration of depressive episodes.

          I propose that the ways people respond to their own symptoms of depression influence the duration of these symptoms. People who engage in ruminative responses to depression, focusing on their symptoms and the possible causes and consequences of their symptoms, will show longer depressions than people who take action to distract themselves from their symptoms. Ruminative responses prolong depression because they allow the depressed mood to negatively bias thinking and interfere with instrumental behavior and problem-solving. Laboratory and field studies directly testing this theory have supported its predictions. I discuss how response styles can explain the greater likelihood of depression in women than men. Then I intergrate this response styles theory with studies of coping with discrete events. The response styles theory is compared to other theories of the duration of depression. Finally, I suggest what may help a depressed person to stop engaging in ruminative responses and how response styles for depression may develop.
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            Prevention of relapse/recurrence in major depression by mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

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              How does cognitive therapy prevent depressive relapse and why should attentional control (mindfulness) training help?

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
                Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1939-2117
                0022-006X
                2004
                2004
                : 72
                : 1
                : 31-40
                Article
                10.1037/0022-006X.72.1.31
                14756612
                f48e89a3-d464-4ae8-b35f-2ffcf8594134
                © 2004

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