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      Production and neuroprotective functions of fractalkine in the central nervous system

      , , ,
      Brain Research
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          The CX3C-chemokine, fractalkine is reportedly to be expressed in the central nervous system, and up-regulated in certain pathological conditions, such as HIV encephalopathy and multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we examined the production of fractalkine and the expression of its receptor, CX3CR1 in murine glial and neuronal cell in vitro, and investigated its neuroprotective functions. Both fractalkine and CX3CR1 were expressed constitutively in neurons, microglia, and astrocytes. Neither the production of fractalkine nor its receptor expression was up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as measured by mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Fractalkine dose-dependently suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha with activated microglia. It also significantly suppressed neuronal cell death induced by microglia activated with LPS and interferon-gamma, in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest the possible functions of fractalkine as an intrinsic inhibitor against neurotoxicity by activated microglia.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Brain Research
          Brain Research
          Elsevier BV
          00068993
          July 2003
          July 2003
          : 979
          : 1-2
          : 65-70
          Article
          10.1016/S0006-8993(03)02867-1
          12850572
          f7356627-d18e-45a0-81fc-4e5a56c135fb
          © 2003

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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