6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A Study on the Adsorption Mechanism of Mercury onAspergillus versicolorBiomass

      , ,

      Environmental Science & Technology

      American Chemical Society (ACS)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The adsorption behavior of mercury on Aspergillus versicolor biomass (AVB) has been investigated in aqueous solution to understand the physicochemical process involved and to explore the potentiality of AVB in pollution control management. This biomass has been successfully used for reducing the mercury concentration level in the effluent of chloralkali and battery industries to a permissible limit. The results establish that 75.6 mg of mercury is adsorbed per gram of biomass. The adsorption process is found to be a function of pH of the solution, with the optimum range being pH 5.0-6.0. The process obeys the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. Scanning electron microscopic analysis demonstrates a conspicuous surface morphology change of the mercury-adsorbed biomass. A nearly uniform distribution of metal ions on the mycelial surface excepting a few aggregation points is revealed by X-ray elemental mapping profiles. The results of zeta potential measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and blocking of the functional groups by chemical modification reflect the binding of mercury on the biomass occurs through electrostatic and complexation reactions. The accumulation of mercury on the cell wall associated with negligible diffusion and or transportation into cytoplasm finds support from the results of adsorption kinetics and transmission electron micrographs. Mercury adsorption on biomass also leads to elongation of cells and cytoplasmic aggregation of spheroplast/protoplasts, indicating that the cell wall acts as a permeation barrier against this toxic metal.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Environmental Science & Technology
          Environ. Sci. Technol.
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          0013-936X
          1520-5851
          December 2007
          December 2007
          : 41
          : 24
          : 8281-8287
          Article
          10.1021/es070814g
          18200852
          f7895890-8463-4dd4-8b5b-4265ae10a674
          © 2007
          Product

          Comments

          Comment on this article