15
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      We Don’t Know Our Own Strength: A Survey of Strength Training Attitudes, Behaviors, and Knowledge in Physical Therapists and Physical Therapist Students

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          Strength training is frequently utilized by physical therapists; however, there has been discussion about whether physical therapists utilize strength training adequately. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the strength training attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge of physical therapists and physical therapy students and to determine how participant characteristics influenced knowledge scores.

          Methods

          An anonymous survey was created in 3 rounds. For round 1, researchers used textbooks to create items assessing demographics, attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge regarding strength training. Rounds 2 and 3 consisted of feedback from 7 content experts until 80% consensus was reached; items were added, removed, or edited based on feedback. The final survey was distributed through social media, list servs, and email targeting physical therapists and students based in the United States. Response frequencies for all items were reported. Overall knowledge scores were calculated by summing correct responses for each item, with a maximum score of 13; scores <70% were considered low. Binomial logistic regression determined which characteristics (demographics, attitudes, or behaviors) influenced whether participants adequately utilized strength training principles (scored ≥70% on knowledge items).

          Results

          There were 777 physical therapist and 648 student participants. Nearly 90% of therapists and students reported frequently prescribing strength training. Over 48% of therapists felt their professional education did not prepare them to apply strength training (compared with 24% of students), and 68% believed that strength training is inadequately applied in physical therapy (compared with 40% of students). Sixty-two percent of therapists and 55% of students scored ≥70% for knowledge items. Additional strength training education and regular participation in strength training increased the odds of scoring ≥70% on knowledge items.

          Conclusion

          Physical therapists and physical therapy students frequently prescribe strength training despite similarly low knowledge scores. To increase knowledge, greater emphasis on strength training in professional education, continuing education, participation in strength training, or all 3 is warranted.

          Impact

          Strength training is an important intervention used in physical therapy and must be used appropriately to improve the health of patients. According to these findings, strength training education may not currently be optimal, as demonstrated by low knowledge scores by both therapists and students. Further work is needed to determine how knowledge of strength training relates to patient outcomes and also how best to implement strength training in physical therapy education and practice.

          Related collections

          Most cited references55

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Research electronic data capture (REDCap)--a metadata-driven methodology and workflow process for providing translational research informatics support.

          Research electronic data capture (REDCap) is a novel workflow methodology and software solution designed for rapid development and deployment of electronic data capture tools to support clinical and translational research. We present: (1) a brief description of the REDCap metadata-driven software toolset; (2) detail concerning the capture and use of study-related metadata from scientific research teams; (3) measures of impact for REDCap; (4) details concerning a consortium network of domestic and international institutions collaborating on the project; and (5) strengths and limitations of the REDCap system. REDCap is currently supporting 286 translational research projects in a growing collaborative network including 27 active partner institutions.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The REDCap consortium: Building an international community of software platform partners

            The Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) data management platform was developed in 2004 to address an institutional need at Vanderbilt University, then shared with a limited number of adopting sites beginning in 2006. Given bi-directional benefit in early sharing experiments, we created a broader consortium sharing and support model for any academic, non-profit, or government partner wishing to adopt the software. Our sharing framework and consortium-based support model have evolved over time along with the size of the consortium (currently more than 3200 REDCap partners across 128 countries). While the "REDCap Consortium" model represents only one example of how to build and disseminate a software platform, lessons learned from our approach may assist other research institutions seeking to build and disseminate innovative technologies.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The Delphi Technique: Making Sense of Consensus

              The Delphi technique is a widely used and accepted method for gathering data from respondents within their domain of expertise. The technique is designed as a group communication process which aims to achieve a convergence of opinion on a specific real-world issue. The Delphi process has been used in various fields of study such as program planning, needs assessment, policy determination, and resource utilization to develop a full range of alternatives, explore or expose underlying assumptions, as well as correlate judgments on a topic spanning a wide range of disciplines. The Delphi technique is well suited as a method for consensus-building by using a series of questionnaires delivered using multiple iterations to collect data from a panel of selected subjects. Subject selection, time frames for conducting and completing a study, the possibility of low response rates, and unintentionally guiding feedback from the respondent group are areas which should be considered when designing and implementing a Delphi study. Accessed 68,465 times on https://pareonline.net from August 30, 2007 to December 31, 2019. For downloads from January 1, 2020 forward, please click on the PlumX Metrics link to the right.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Physical Therapy
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0031-9023
                1538-6724
                December 01 2021
                December 01 2021
                December 01 2021
                December 01 2021
                August 27 2021
                : 101
                : 12
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Arkansas Colleges of Health Education, School of Physical Therapy, Fort Smith, Arkansas, USA
                [2 ]Department of Exercise Science, Physical Therapy Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
                [3 ]School of Kinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA
                Article
                10.1093/ptj/pzab204
                f7b4b2df-7cda-4f35-a97d-2e15a65e699c
                © 2021

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article