1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Using Perceived Self-Efficacy to Improve Fatigue and Fatigability In Post-Surgical Lung Cancer Patients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

      , MSN, PhD, RN, , PhD, RN, AOCN, APRN-BC, , PhD, RN, FAAN, , PhD, , PhD, , PhD, RN, FAAN

      Cancer nursing

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Fatigue remains a prevalent and debilitating symptom in persons with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exercise has been shown to be effective in reducing fatigue; yet interventions are limited for post-surgical NSCLC patients. To date, while surgery is offered as a standard curative treatment for NSCLC, no formal guidelines exist for post-surgical rehabilitation.

          Objective

          This study focuses on the design and testing of a post-surgical intervention for NSCLC patients to promote perceived self-efficacy for fatigue self-management targeting cancer-related fatigue (CRF) severity and its associated fatigability through exercise.

          Interventions/ Methods

          A two-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) was used to examine the impact of a 6-week rehabilitative CRF self-management exercise intervention on 37 NSCLC participants compared with 35 control group participants receiving usual care from diagnosis to 6 weeks post-surgical hospital discharge.

          Results

          We exceeded goals for recruitment (66%), retention (97%), adherence (93%), and acceptability. Our 6-week exercise intervention demonstrated preliminary efficacy in significantly reducing CRF severity and fatigability as compared to usual care, with mean CRF levels restored to levels lower than pre-surgery. Likewise, the exercise group's functional performance (physical and mental health scores) exceeded usual care. Further, no adverse events were reported; participants had a mean age of 67 and a mean of 8 comorbid conditions.

          Conclusions

          An exercise intervention for post-surgical NSCLC patients is feasible, safe, and highly acceptable showing positive changes in CRF self-management.

          Implications for Practice

          To advance practice, testing of the effectiveness of this health-promoting self-management exercise intervention in a larger-scale RCT.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          7805358
          2784
          Cancer Nurs
          Cancer Nurs
          Cancer nursing
          0162-220X
          1538-9804
          1 March 2016
          Jan-Feb 2017
          01 January 2018
          : 40
          : 1
          : 1-12
          Affiliations
          College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
          Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan
          College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
          Psychology Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
          Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY
          School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Amy J. Hoffman, PhD, RN, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, 1355 Bogue St., Office C246, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1315 ( amy.hoffman@ 123456ht.msu.edu ; ahoffman32@ 123456aol.com )
          Article
          PMC5086324 PMC5086324 5086324 nihpa763533
          10.1097/NCC.0000000000000378
          5086324
          27135752
          Categories
          Article

          Comments

          Comment on this article