20
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      A 4000-Year Lacustrine Record of Environmental Change in the Southern Maya Lowlands, Petén, Guatemala

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A 4000-yr sediment core record from Lake Salpetén, Guatemala, provides evidence for Maya-induced forest clearance and consequent soil erosion between ∼1700 cal yr B.C. and 850 cal yr A.D. Radiocarbon ages of wood, seeds, and charcoal support an age-depth model with average errors of ±110 cal yr. Relatively low carbonate δ 18O values between 1300 and 400 cal yr B.C. coincide with pollen evidence for forest loss, consistent with increased surface and groundwater flow to the lake. Minimum δ 18O values between 400 cal yr B.C. and 150 cal yr A.D. suggest a high lake level, as do 14C-dated aquatic gastropods as much as 7.5 m above the present lake stage. High lake levels resulted from reduced evaporation-to-precipitation ratios, increased hydrologic input caused by anthropogenic deforestation, or both. The Preclassic abandonment (150 A.D.) and Early Classic/Late Classic boundary (550 A.D.) are marked by relatively high δ 18O values indicating reduced lake levels. Oxygen isotope composition increased further coincident with the Terminal Classic Maya demographic decline between 800 and 900 A.D. This period of high δ 18O may have been caused by the greater aridity that has been documented in northern Yucatán lakes or by decreased hydrologic input to the lake as a consequence of forest recovery. Reduced soil erosion after 850 cal yr A.D. coincided with the Terminal Classic Maya demographic decline and permitted forest recovery and resumption of organic sedimentation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          The operated Markov´s chains in economy (discrete chains of Markov with the income)

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            INTCAL98 Radiocarbon Age Calibration, 24,000–0 cal BP

            The focus of this paper is the conversion of radiocarbon ages to calibrated (cal) ages for the interval 24,000–0 cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), based upon a sample set of dendrochronologically dated tree rings, uranium-thorium dated corals, and varve-counted marine sediment. The14C age–cal age information, produced by many laboratories, is converted to Δ14C profiles and calibration curves, for the atmosphere as well as the oceans. We discuss offsets in measuredl4C ages and the errors therein, regional14C age differences, tree–coral14C age comparisons and the time dependence of marine reservoir ages, and evaluate decadalvs. single-year14C results. Changes in oceanic deepwater circulation, especially for the 16,000–11,000 cal BP interval, are reflected in the Δ14C values of INTCAL98.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              A review of catchment experiments to determine the effect of vegetation changes on water yield and evapotranspiration

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Quaternary Research
                Quat. res.
                Elsevier BV
                0033-5894
                1096-0287
                March 2002
                January 20 2017
                March 2002
                : 57
                : 2
                : 183-190
                Article
                10.1006/qres.2001.2305
                f9284dc4-70c6-480b-ab35-8d0527be409c
                © 2002

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article