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      The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators

      , , , , ,
      Teaching and Learning in Medicine
      Informa UK Limited

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          Abstract

          <div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S1"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d12818414e164">Problem</h5> <p id="P1">Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S2"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d12818414e169">Intervention</h5> <p id="P2">The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of <i>engagement, imagination</i>, and <i>alignment</i> for identity formation. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S3"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d12818414e180">Context</h5> <p id="P3">Through course requirements, learners <i>engage</i> and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners <i>imagine</i> personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to <i>align</i> with the broader educator community of practice. </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S4"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d12818414e194">Outcome</h5> <p id="P4">From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued <i>engagement</i> with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations ( <i>imagination</i>), joined an educator-in-training community ( <i>engagement/imagination</i>), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications ( <i>alignment</i>). </p> </div><div class="section"> <a class="named-anchor" id="S5"> <!-- named anchor --> </a> <h5 class="section-title" id="d12818414e211">Lessons Learned</h5> <p id="P5">Learners identified <i>engagement</i> with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for <i>imagining</i> and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator communities of practice. Also important for learner success was <i>alignment</i> of their projects with the goals of the local educator community of practice. Our community of practice approach to educator career development has shown promising early outcomes by nurturing learners' passion for teaching; expanding their interest in educational leadership, innovation, and scholarship; and focusing on their identity formation as future educators. </p> </div>

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          Most cited references35

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          Provisional Selves: Experimenting with Image and Identity in Professional Adaptation

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            Boundary Crossing and Boundary Objects

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              Experience-based learning: a model linking the processes and outcomes of medical students' workplace learning.

              To develop a model linking the processes and outcomes of workplace learning. We synthesised a model from grounded theory analysis of group discussions before and after experimental strengthening of medical students' workplace learning. The research was conducted within a problem-based clinical curriculum with little early workplace experience, involving 24 junior and 12 senior medical students. To reach their ultimate goal of helping patients, medical students must develop 2 qualities. One is practical competence; the other is a state of mind that includes confidence, motivation and a sense of professional identity. These 2 qualities reinforce one another. The core process of clinical workplace learning involves 'participation in practice', which evolves along a spectrum from passive observation to performance. Practitioners help students participate by being both supportive and challenging. The presentation of clear learning objectives and continuous periods of attachment that are as personal to the student(s) and practitioner(s) as possible promote workplace learning. The core condition for clinical workplace learning is 'supported participation', the various outcomes of which are mutually reinforcing and also reinforce students' ability to participate in further practice. This synthesis has 2 important implications for contemporary medical education: any reduction in medical students' participation in clinical practice that results from the patient safety agenda and expanded numbers of medical students is likely to have an adverse effect on learning, and the construct of 'self-directed learning', which our respondents too often found synonymous with 'lack of support', should be applied with very great caution to medical students' learning in clinical workplaces.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Teaching and Learning in Medicine
                Teaching and Learning in Medicine
                Informa UK Limited
                1040-1334
                1532-8015
                January 04 2017
                November 04 2016
                : 29
                : 2
                : 216-227
                Article
                10.1080/10401334.2016.1230500
                5546872
                27813688
                fb910379-2ec7-4e7b-91f4-049a04bac2bc
                © 2016
                History

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