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      Cohort Profile Update: The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)

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          A contemplated revision of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory

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            Normative values of cognitive and physical function in older adults: findings from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing.

            To provide normative values of tests of cognitive and physical function based on a large sample representative of the population of Ireland aged 50 and older. Data were used from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), a prospective cohort study that includes a comprehensive health assessment. Health assessment was undertaken at one of two dedicated health assessment centers or in the study participant's home if travel was not practicable. Five thousand eight hundred ninety-seven members of a nationally representative sample of the community-living population of Ireland aged 50 and older. Those with severe cognitive impairment, dementia, or Parkinson's disease were excluded. Measurements included height and weight, normal walking speed, Timed Up-and-Go, handgrip strength, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Color Trails Test, and bone mineral density. Normative values were estimated using generalized additive models for location shape and scale (GAMLSS) and are presented as percentiles, means, and standard deviations. Generalized additive models for location shape and scale fit the observed data well for each measure, leading to reliable estimates of normative values. Performance on all tasks decreased with age. Educational attainment was a strong determinant of performance on all cognitive tests. Tests of walking speed were dependent on height. Distribution of body mass index did not change with age, owing to simultaneous declines in weight and height. Normative values were found for tests of many aspects of cognitive and physical function based on a representative sample of the general older Irish population. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.
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              Age-related normative changes in phasic orthostatic blood pressure in a large population study: findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA).

              In this report, we provide the first normative reference data and prevalence estimates of impaired orthostatic blood pressure (BP) stabilization, initial orthostatic hypotension, and orthostatic hypotension based on beat-to-beat blood pressure methods in a population-representative sample.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Epidemiology
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0300-5771
                1464-3685
                October 2018
                October 01 2018
                August 13 2018
                October 2018
                October 01 2018
                August 13 2018
                : 47
                : 5
                : 1398-1398l
                Affiliations
                [1 ]The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
                [2 ]Centre for Advanced Medical Imaging, St James’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
                [3 ]Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
                [4 ]Mercer’s Institute for Successful Ageing (MISA), St James’s Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
                Article
                10.1093/ije/dyy163
                fecb9e34-2df3-44b5-a2a7-6dcf0260ec0c
                © 2018

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model


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