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      THE MANAGEMENT OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

      research-article
      Prometheus
      Pluto Journals
      management, research, scientific ethic, models
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            Abstract

            This paper examines the way publicly funded research organisations are managed in terms of the ethos of the scientific staff. Three models for the management of such organisations are considered and the recent management history of CSIRO is examined in relation to these models. The Organisation has changed its management style as result of recent reviews; the consequences of this are considered.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Journal
            cpro20
            CPRO
            Prometheus
            Critical Studies in Innovation
            Pluto Journals
            0810-9028
            1470-1030
            June 1989
            : 7
            : 1
            : 75-91
            Affiliations
            Article
            8629042 Prometheus, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1989: pp. 75–91
            10.1080/08109028908629042
            bc0a9597-b6af-4519-aea0-fc0c6ede1929
            Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

            All content is freely available without charge to users or their institutions. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles in this journal without asking prior permission of the publisher or the author. Articles published in the journal are distributed under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

            History
            Page count
            Figures: 0, Tables: 0, References: 14, Pages: 17
            Categories
            Original Articles

            Computer science,Arts,Social & Behavioral Sciences,Law,History,Economics
            models,scientific ethic,research,management

            NOTES AND REFERENCES

            1. M. Mulkay, Science and the Sociology of Knowledge.’, London, George Allen and Unwin, 1970; J.R. Philip, ‘Towards diversity and adaptability: an Australian view of governmentally supported science’, Minerva.’, 16, 1978, pp. 54–73.

            2. M. Mulkay, ‘Sociology of the scientific research community’, in Science, Technology and Society.’, I. Spiegel-Rösing and D. de Solla Price (eds), London and Beverly Hills, Sage Publications, 1977, pp. 93–148.

            3. Philip, op. cit., M. Polanyi, ‘The Republic of Science’, Minerva., 1, 1962, pp. 397–415.

            4. Mulkay, op. cit. Polanyi, op. cit., J. Ziman, ‘What are the options? Social determinants of personal research plans’, Minerva., 19, 1981, pp. 1–42.

            5. R. K. Merton, ‘The Matthew effect in science’, in N.W. Storer (ed.), The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations., Chicago and London, Chicago University Press, 1973, pp. 439–459.

            6. J.R. Anderson and K.A. Parton, ‘Techniques for guiding the allocation of resources among rural research projects: state of the art’, Prometheus., 1, 1, 1983, pp. 180–201. The authors conclude that formal project evaluation schemes provide dubious advantages over modest scoring systems, intuitive methods and ‘rules of thumb’.

            7. C. Freeman, ‘Economics of research and development’, in I. Spiegel-Rösing and D. de Solla Price, op. cit., pp. 223–275.

            8. Mulkay, op. cit.

            9. ibid.

            10. R. Johnston and Jean Buckley, ‘The shaping of contemporary scientific institutions’, in R.W. Home (ed.), Australian Science in the Making., Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988, pp. 374–398. Johnston and Buckley note that, from the late 1970s, “funds continued to be provided for research … but without the substantial growth of earlier times.” They note that the Act that established ASTEC IN 1979, “specifically confirmed CSIRO's role in undertaking basic research …”.

            11. A. J. Birch (Chairman), Report of the Independent Inquiry into the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation., Canberra, Australian Government Publishing Service, 1977.

            12. Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC), Future Directions for CSIRO., Report to the Prime Minister, Canberra, Australian Government Publishing Service, 1985.

            13. R. Rivett, David Rivett: Fighter for Australian Science., Melbourne, Rivett, 1972.

            14. CSIRO Report of the Institute Model Study. The report of a project team set up by CSIRO to work with McKinsey & Co., Management Consultants, to analyse and recommend on the management structures and practices of CSIRO.

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