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      Fair Trade Software: empowering people, enabling economies

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            Abstract

            Fair Trade Software (FTS) builds on the principles of conventional Fair Trade and applies them to software services in developing countries. Using a model of Shared Value Creation, FTS leverages reputation enhancement opportunities for companies in OECD countries to encourage them to share knowledge with partners in developing countries. Working in this way has been demonstrated to improve the quality and capacity of software companies in developing countries and generate digital employment for urban youth. The improvement gains can lead to significant improvements in other sectors that rely on digital services, e.g. healthcare and education.

            Content

            Author and article information

            Journal
            10.2307/j50020019
            jfairtrade
            Journal of Fair Trade
            Pluto Journals
            2513-9525
            2513-9533
            1 June 2020
            : 2
            : 1 ( doiID: 10.13169/jfairtrade.2.issue-1 )
            : 4-12
            Article
            jfairtrade.2.1.0004
            10.13169/jfairtrade.2.1.0004
            e1921950-7ae5-4e33-96c6-6b93995ec30a
            © 2020 Pluto Journals

            All content is freely available without charge to users or their institutions. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles in this journal without asking prior permission of the publisher or the author. Articles published in the journal are distributed under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

            Custom metadata
            eng

            Education,Agriculture,Social & Behavioral Sciences,History,Economics
            digital training in developing countries,Fair Trade innovation,Fair Trade Software,ICT4D

            References

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