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      Touch and Go: On the use of proprioception to convey a meaningful experience in virtual reality

      Proceedings of EVA London 2020 (EVA 2020)

      AI and the Arts: Artificial Imagination

      6th July – 9th July 2020

      Proprioception, Virtual Reality, Perception, Experience

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          Abstract

          Proprioception is the usually unconscious ability to monitor the position of our body in the world. Two aspects of proprioception may be of particular interest in the construction of virtual reality environments. The first, proprioceptive memory, occurs when a recalled position of our body overrides the actual position of our body or limb. The second, proprioceptive drift, occurs when the sense of ownership of part of our body is transferred externally. The abstract navigable virtual reality environment The Sonic Stage employs these two aspects of proprioception to enhance the place illusion and plausibility of the environment.

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          Most cited references 6

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          The proprioceptive senses: their roles in signaling body shape, body position and movement, and muscle force.

          This is a review of the proprioceptive senses generated as a result of our own actions. They include the senses of position and movement of our limbs and trunk, the sense of effort, the sense of force, and the sense of heaviness. Receptors involved in proprioception are located in skin, muscles, and joints. Information about limb position and movement is not generated by individual receptors, but by populations of afferents. Afferent signals generated during a movement are processed to code for endpoint position of a limb. The afferent input is referred to a central body map to determine the location of the limbs in space. Experimental phantom limbs, produced by blocking peripheral nerves, have shown that motor areas in the brain are able to generate conscious sensations of limb displacement and movement in the absence of any sensory input. In the normal limb tendon organs and possibly also muscle spindles contribute to the senses of force and heaviness. Exercise can disturb proprioception, and this has implications for musculoskeletal injuries. Proprioceptive senses, particularly of limb position and movement, deteriorate with age and are associated with an increased risk of falls in the elderly. The more recent information available on proprioception has given a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these senses as well as providing new insight into a range of clinical conditions.
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            Experimental evidence of the roles of music choice, social context, and listener personality in emotional reactions to music

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              Proprioception

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2020
                July 2020
                : 341-346
                Affiliations
                Academy of Visual Arts

                Hong Kong Baptist University

                Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/EVA2020.61
                © Yakir. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of EVA London 2020

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of EVA London 2020
                EVA 2020
                30
                London
                6th July – 9th July 2020
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                AI and the Arts: Artificial Imagination
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning and Development Ltd
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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