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      An approach to designing interactive decision aid for cardiac patients

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      Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      4 - 8 July 2011

      Decision aids, cognitive work analysis, work domain analysis

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          Abstract

          The design of interactive decision aids for patients is challenging because there are few if any guidelines for information design for such devices. In this paper, we look at designing an interactive decision aid through the use of Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) for cardiac patient needs. We focus on three analysis phases: work domain analysis (WDA), control task analysis, and strategies analysis. We discuss these three phases of the CWA, how we collected user needs using focus groups, and how the content of support is represented in each of these three levels. Finally, we discuss how the three levels influenced our design recommendations and ideas for how the information is presented.

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          Most cited references 10

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          Decision making in oncology: a review of patient decision aids to support patient participation.

          Although cancer management is becoming more structured with disease-specific guidelines and clinical pathways, many decisions remain complex. Contributing to this complexity is the need to make value tradeoffs between benefits and harms across cancer treatment and/or screening options. Since there is no "best" option for everyone, decisions are defined as being of higher quality when informed with the latest scientific evidence and based on patients' informed values associated with outcomes of options. However, clinicians are not good judges of patients' values, and patients often have inadequate knowledge, unrealistic expectations, and decisional conflict that interfere with their involvement in decision making. Effective approaches to support patient involvement into clinical decisions include clinicians trained in shared decision making, question prompt sheets, patient decision aids, and decision coaching by nurses and other allied health professionals. Based on systematic review of 23 randomized trials of cancer patient decision aids, patients exposed to decision aids are more likely to participate in decision making and achieve higher-quality decisions. This review highlights key historical changes leading to patient involvement in decision making, summarizes evidence on effective interventions to support shared decision making, explores strategies to implement these interventions in oncology practices, and identifies future directions.
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            Modeling a medical environment: an ontology for integrated medical informatics design.

            Modern medical environments have seen an increase in technological complexity and pressures of handling more patients with fewer resources, resulting in higher demands on medical practitioners. Medical informatics designers will have to focus on the problem of organizing medical information more effectively to enable practitioners to cope with these challenges. This article addresses this research problem for the particular area of medical problem solving in patient care. First, we describe a traditional modeling approach for medical reasoning used as a basis for developing some decision support systems. We argue these models may be faithful to what is known about biomedical knowledge, but they have limitations for human problem solving, especially in unanticipated situations. Second, we present an ontological framework, known as the abstraction hierarchy (Rasmussen, IEEE Trans. Man. Cybernetics 15 (1985) 234-243), for integrating patient representations that are faithful to existing biomedical knowledge and that are consistent with what is known about human problem solving. Through an example of a critical event in the operating room, we reveal how this framework can support medical problem solving in unanticipated situations. Third, we show how to use these representations as a frame of reference for mapping medical roles, responsibilities, sensors, and controls in an operating room context. Finally, we provide some insight for medical informatics designers in using this framework to design novel training programs and human-computer displays.
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              Evaluating design proposals for complex systems with work domain analysis.

              In this paper we propose a new framework for evaluating designs based on work domain analysis, the first phase of cognitive work analysis. We develop a rationale for a new approach to evaluation by describing the unique characteristics of complex systems and by showing that systems engineering techniques only partially accommodate these characteristics. We then present work domain analysis as a complementary framework for evaluation. We explain this technique by example by showing how the Australian Defence Force used work domain analysis to evaluate design proposals for a new system called Airborne Early Warning and Control. This case study also demonstrates that work domain analysis is a useful and feasible approach that complements standard techniques for evaluation and that promotes a central role for human factors professionals early in the system design and development process. Actual or potential applications of this research include the evaluation of designs for complex systems.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2011
                July 2011
                : 405-412
                Affiliations
                School of Electronic, Electrical and Computer Engineering

                University of Birmingham
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2011.71
                © Anandhi V Dhukaram et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of HCI 2011 The 25th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                25
                Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
                4 - 8 July 2011
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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