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      Using digital technologies to test the Social Norms Approach to reducing electricity consumption

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      The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction

      12 - 14 September 2012

      Social norms approach, framing, domestic electricity, greenhouse gases, households, mixed methods

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          Abstract

          An 18-week experimental intervention with 316 Bristol householders used digital technologies to collect and feed back hourly data on participants’ own electricity consumption and that of others in their neighbourhood. By providing digital feedback (by email and web) to two thirds of participants and only giving half of these the social data, the study set out to test the effectiveness of the social norms approach at reducing domestic electricity consumption in a UK setting. Initial findings suggest little difference between the impact of individual feedback and individual plus social feedback but point to the importance of the granularity of feedback data and the inclusion, in future research, of large samples, extended data collection periods and adequate experimental controls.

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          Most cited references 4

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          REDUCING HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION: A QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE FIELD STUDY

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            Models of attitude-behavior relations.

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              The relative impact of injunctive norms on college student drinking: the role of reference group.

              This research evaluated the importance of reference groups in the relationships between injunctive norms and alcohol consumption for college student drinkers. First-year students (N = 811; 58% women) completed online assessments of their drinking behavior, as well as their perceptions of the approval (injunctive norms) and prevalence (descriptive norms) of drinking by others. Injunctive norms were evaluated with respect to typical students, typical same-sex students, friends, and parents. Descriptive norms were evaluated with respect to typical students and typical same-sex students. Results suggested that for injunctive norms, only perceptions of proximal reference groups (friends and parents) are positively associated with drinking behavior. However, when considered in the context of multiple referents and norms, injunctive norms for more distal groups (typical students/same-sex students) were negatively associated with personal drinking, whereas descriptive norms for distal referents remained positively associated with drinking. Results suggest that injunctive norms are more complex than descriptive norms and these complexities warrant important consideration in the development of intervention strategies. 2008 APA, all rights reserved
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2012
                September 2012
                : 1-4
                Affiliations
                Business School, Kingston

                University, Kingston Hill

                Kingston-upon-Thames

                KT2 7LB, UK
                Department of Engineering

                University of the West of England

                Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour

                Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY, UK
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2012.97
                © Tim Harries et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
                HCI
                26
                Birmingham, UK
                12 - 14 September 2012
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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