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SUPERHUB: Integrating behaviour change theories into a sustainable urban-mobility platform

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The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI)

Human Computer Interaction

12 - 14 September 2012

Behaviour Change, Greenhouse Gas Reduction, Sustainable Travel, Persuasion, Transport, Urban Mobility

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      Abstract

      The SUPERHUB project (SUstainable and PERsuasive Human Users moBility in future cities) promotes the creation of a new urban mobility services ecosystem to facilitate the take-up of environmentally sustainable behaviours. It will design and test an open platform able to combine in real time all mobility offers from the relevant stakeholders together with a set of enabling mobility services able to address users’ mobility needs and to foster behavioural change. This paper explores how SUPERHUB plans to integrate behaviour change theories.

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      Most cited references 8

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      Making psychological theory useful for implementing evidence based practice: a consensus approach.

       ,  S Michie,  Mark Parker (2005)
      Evidence-based guidelines are often not implemented effectively with the result that best health outcomes are not achieved. This may be due to a lack of theoretical understanding of the processes involved in changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals. This paper reports the development of a consensus on a theoretical framework that could be used in implementation research. The objectives were to identify an agreed set of key theoretical constructs for use in (1) studying the implementation of evidence based practice and (2) developing strategies for effective implementation, and to communicate these constructs to an interdisciplinary audience. Six phases of work were conducted to develop a consensus: (1) identifying theoretical constructs; (2) simplifying into construct domains; (3) evaluating the importance of the construct domains; (4) interdisciplinary evaluation; (5) validating the domain list; and (6) piloting interview questions. The contributors were a "psychological theory" group (n = 18), a "health services research" group (n = 13), and a "health psychology" group (n = 30). Twelve domains were identified to explain behaviour change: (1) knowledge, (2) skills, (3) social/professional role and identity, (4) beliefs about capabilities, (5) beliefs about consequences, (6) motivation and goals, (7) memory, attention and decision processes, (8) environmental context and resources, (9) social influences, (10) emotion regulation, (11) behavioural regulation, and (12) nature of the behaviour. A set of behaviour change domains agreed by a consensus of experts is available for use in implementation research. Applications of this domain list will enhance understanding of the behaviour change processes inherent in implementation of evidence-based practice and will also test the validity of these proposed domains.
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        Effective techniques in healthy eating and physical activity interventions: a meta-regression.

        Meta-analyses of behavior change (BC) interventions typically find large heterogeneity in effectiveness and small effects. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of active BC interventions designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating and investigate whether theoretically specified BC techniques improve outcome. Interventions, evaluated in experimental or quasi-experimental studies, using behavioral and/or cognitive techniques to increase physical activity and healthy eating in adults, were systematically reviewed. Intervention content was reliably classified into 26 BC techniques and the effects of individual techniques, and of a theoretically derived combination of self-regulation techniques, were assessed using meta-regression. Valid outcomes of physical activity and healthy eating. The 122 evaluations (N = 44,747) produced an overall pooled effect size of 0.31 (95% confidence interval = 0.26 to 0.36, I(2) = 69%). The technique, "self-monitoring," explained the greatest amount of among-study heterogeneity (13%). Interventions that combined self-monitoring with at least one other technique derived from control theory were significantly more effective than the other interventions (0.42 vs. 0.26). Classifying interventions according to component techniques and theoretically derived technique combinations and conducting meta-regression enabled identification of effective components of interventions designed to increase physical activity and healthy eating. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.
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          Does tailoring matter? Meta-analytic review of tailored print health behavior change interventions.

          Although there is a large and growing literature on tailored print health behavior change interventions, it is currently not known if or to what extent tailoring works. The current study provides a meta-analytic review of this literature, with a primary focus on the effects of tailoring. A comprehensive search strategy yielded 57 studies that met inclusion criteria. Those studies-which contained a cumulative N = 58,454-were subsequently meta-analyzed. The sample size-weighted mean effect size of the effects of tailoring on health behavior change was found to be r = .074. Variables that were found to significantly moderate the effect included (a) type of comparison condition, (b) health behavior, (c) type of participant population (both type of recruitment and country of sample), (d) type of print material, (e) number of intervention contacts, (f) length of follow-up, (g) number and type of theoretical concepts tailored on, and (h) whether demographics and/or behavior were tailored on. Implications of these results are discussed and future directions for research on tailored health messages and interventions are offered. Copyright 2007 APA
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Computing Science, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE
            Contributors
            Conference
            September 2012
            September 2012
            : 1-4
            10.14236/ewic/HCI2012.99
            © Paula J. Forbes et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction
            HCI
            26
            Birmingham, UK
            12 - 14 September 2012
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            Human Computer Interaction
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

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