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Managing Gravity Infusion using a Mobile Application

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Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014) (HCI)

BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)

9 - 12 September 2014

Human Computer Interaction, Mobile Medical Applications, Gravity Infusion, Intravenous Therapy

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      Abstract

      Gravity infusion, also known as “the drip,” is a common and basic method for delivering fluids to a patient, without the use of any complex medical devices, such as an infusion pump or a syringe driver. Nevertheless there are many quite complex and error-prone steps involved in setting up a gravity infusion for the correct dose, and since there is no computer or similar technology involved to assist with the procedure, it can be difficult to guarantee the accuracy and consistency of the fluid delivery.

      This paper presents a new method for accurately setting gravity infusion drug delivery, based on a handheld mobile application that includes a novel approach to help estimate flow rate and double-check the steps involved in setting it up. We demonstrate how simple visual interfaces can play an important role in the healthcare setting, and we explain safety features that have been implemented to catch common errors and slips that can occur.

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      Most cited references 7

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      Reducing number entry errors: solving a widespread, serious problem

      Number entry is ubiquitous: it is required in many fields including science, healthcare, education, government, mathematics and finance. People entering numbers are to be expected to make errors, but shockingly few systems make any effort to detect, block or otherwise manage errors. Worse, errors may be ignored but processed in arbitrary ways, with unintended results. A standard class of error (defined in the paper) is an ‘out by 10 error’, which is easily made by miskeying a decimal point or a zero. In safety-critical domains, such as drug delivery, out by 10 errors generally have adverse consequences. Here, we expose the extent of the problem of numeric errors in a very wide range of systems. An analysis of better error management is presented: under reasonable assumptions, we show that the probability of out by 10 errors can be halved by better user interface design. We provide a demonstration user interface to show that the approach is practical. To kill an error is as good a service as, and sometimes even better than, the establishing of a new truth or fact. (Charles Darwin 1879 [2008], p. 229)
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        Calculators are needlessly bad

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          A New Calculator and Why it is Necessary

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            University of Nottingham

            Nottingham

            NG8 1BB
            University of Swansea

            Swansea

            SA2 8PP
            Singleton Hospital

            Swansea

            SA2 8QA
            Contributors
            Conference
            September 2014
            September 2014
            : 299-304
            10.14236/ewic/HCI2014.48
            © Mark Davies et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014), Southport, UK

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Proceedings of the 28th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)
            HCI
            28
            Southport, UK
            9 - 12 September 2014
            Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
            BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2014)
            Product
            Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
            Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
            Categories
            Electronic Workshops in Computing

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