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      Designing Digital Mindfulness-based Interventions for Older Informal Carers

      1 , 1 , 2

      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Older Adults, Informal Carers, Technology Design, Stress Management, Mindfulness-based Interventions

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          Abstract

          Stress is prevalent among older informal carers and has been shown to lead to negative developments in physical and psychological health, as well as overall wellbeing. One area of wellbeing that can be impacted is sleep, with high stress levels leading to poor sleep and poor sleep causing stress. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have grown in popularity in recent years and have been shown to reduce stress and increase quality of life among older informal carers. MBIs delivered digitally have the potential to be used by and be of benefit to a wide group of people. Based on the apparent gaps in the literature concerning the area of mobile device/computer-mediated MBIs for older informal carers, further research is needed in this area. An opportunity also lies in the use of wearable activity trackers to monitor any potential improvements in sleep, due to reduced stress. This paper focuses on the design of a digital application delivering MBIs, to support older informal carers to manage stress and sleep. We describe a qualitative study with older informal carers and the resulting digital application while outlining how this system will be trialled with 15 older informal carers over a 12-week period with a view to reducing stress and improving overall wellbeing.

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          Most cited references 19

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          The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction therapy on mental health of adults with a chronic medical disease: a meta-analysis.

          The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on depression, anxiety and psychological distress across populations with different chronic somatic diseases. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to examine the effects of MBSR on depression, anxiety, and psychological distress. The influence of quality of studies on the effects of MBSR was analyzed. Eight published, randomized controlled outcome studies were included. An overall effect size on depression of 0.26 was found, indicating a small effect of MBSR on depression. The effect size for anxiety was 0.47. However, quality of the studies was found to moderate this effect size. When the studies of lower quality were excluded, an effect size of 0.24 on anxiety was found. A small effect size (0.32) was also found for psychological distress. It can be concluded that MBSR has small effects on depression, anxiety and psychological distress in people with chronic somatic diseases. Integrating MBSR in behavioral therapy may enhance the efficacy of mindfulness based interventions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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            Mindfulness meditation and improvement in sleep quality and daytime impairment among older adults with sleep disturbances: a randomized clinical trial.

            Sleep disturbances are most prevalent among older adults and often go untreated. Treatment options for sleep disturbances remain limited, and there is a need for community-accessible programs that can improve sleep.
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              Associations among perceptions of social support, negative affect, and quality of sleep in caregivers and noncaregivers.

              The authors used structural equation modeling to examine associations among perceptions of negative affect, social support, and quality of sleep in a sample of caregivers (n = 175) and noncaregiver control participants (n = 169). The authors hypothesized that caregiver status would be related to sleep quality directly and also indirectly by way of negative affect and social support. This hypothesis was partially supported in that caregiving was found to be indirectly related to sleep quality. However, after accounting for the indirect effects of negative affect and social support, the direct effect of caregiving on sleep quality was no longer statistically significant. The structural model accounted for approximately 43% of the variance in sleep quality. The present findings may be useful in the development of successful sleep interventions for caregivers. 2006 APA, all rights reserved
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-12
                Affiliations
                [1 ] NetwellCASALA

                Dundalk Institute of Technology

                Dundalk, Ireland
                [2 ] School of Health and Science

                Dundalk Institute of Technology

                Dundalk, Ireland
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.52
                © Wilson et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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