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      Reflections on the Doctoral Consortium

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      Proceedings of the 33rd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (BCS HCI 2020)

      Human Computer Interaction

      6 July 2020

      lived experience, doctoral consortium, HCI, doctoral training

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          Abstract

          This paper provides a reflective commentary on the British HCI Doctoral Consortium from the perspective of the Organising Committee. We discuss the approach to holding a Human Computer Interaction Doctoral Consortium in July 2020 and the outcomes. We reflect on our lived experience pre, during and post event, flagging issues and perspectives that emerged from the day, and possible implications for doctoral consortiums and training for HCI.

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          Most cited references 21

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          A usability study of a critical man–machine interface: Can layperson responders perform optimal compression rates when using a public access defibrillator with automated real-time feedback during cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

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            Exploring what the Notion of ‘Lived Experience’ Offers for Social Policy Analysis

            In this article, we suggest that social policy may be on the cusp of a large-scale adoption of the notion of lived experience. However, within social policy and allied disciplines, the growing use of the term ‘lived experience’ is unaccompanied by discussion of what it may mean or imply. We argue that now is a good time to consider what this term could mean for social policy analysis. The peculiarities of Anglo-centric usage of the broader term ‘experience’ are explored, before we identify and discuss several roots from which understandings of ‘lived experience’ as a concept and a research strategy have grown: namely, phenomenology, feminist writing and ethnography. Drawing on multiple historical and contemporary international literatures, we identify a set of dilemmas and propositions around: assumed authenticity, questioning taken-for-grantedness, intercorporeality, embodied subjectivity; political strategies of recognition, risks of essentialising, and immediacy of unique personal experiences versus inscription of discourse. We argue that lived experience can inform sharp critique and offer an innovative window on aspects of the ‘shared typical’. Our central intention is to encourage and frame debate over what lived experience could mean theoretically and methodologically within social policy contexts and what the implications may be for its continued use.
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              Exploring temporal behaviour of app users completing ecological momentary assessments using mental health scales and mood logs

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2020
                July 2020
                : 7-14
                Affiliations
                Faculty of Technology

                University of Sunderland
                Director of Computational Foundry

                Swansea University
                School of Computing and Mathematics

                Keele University
                School of Computing

                Ulster University
                School of Physical Sciences and Computing

                University of Central Lancashire
                School of Computing

                Edinburgh Napier University
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI20DC.2
                © Hall et al. Published by BCS Learning & Development. Proceedings of the BCS HCI Doctoral Consortium 2020. Keele University, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 33rd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                BCS HCI 2020
                33
                Keele University, UK
                6 July 2020
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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