Blog
About

124
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    4
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Conference Proceedings: found
      Is Open Access

      Reassessing and extending the Precision and Recall concepts

      MIRA '99 (MIRA)

      MIRA '99

      14th - 16th April 1999

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The contrivances of ‘Recall’ and ‘Precision’ are customarily used to assess the effectiveness of document retrieval systems. Despite their extensive use in experiments, including the recent TREC experiments, and their dominance in mathematical discussions of system performance, there has been continual questioning of their validity since their introduction with the Cranfield experiments. This has largely centred on critical analysis of the (pre-mathematical) concept of ‘relevance’. Those analyses have now led to the near-consensual view amongst relevance theoreticians that two types of relevance require to be distinguished, namely (1) document ‘topicality’, where cognition acts as a largely passive receiving agent of knowledge that has an objective, a priori or public character, and (2) ‘psychological relevance’, where cognition is more actively and creatively involved in the knowledge encoded in the document, i.e. where relevance is non-public (subjective) and conditioned by the user’s context and experience (etc) at a particular time. (Various synonyms for these terms have been suggested.) The continued use of P and R in their initial, largely Cranfield, form in document retrieval experiments, especially the continued, uncritical, use of ‘Recall’, suggest that experimentalists have largely failed to internalise this distinction, since (1) Recall is meaningless under one of these viewpoints, and (2) Precision is ambiguous when the separate validities of each are recognised. Several ways in which this distinction should influence the design of future experiments on document-retrieval/cognition interactions are suggested, involving the choice of, and amendments to the definitions of, these basic measures. Lastly, a generic 3-valued vectorial approach is suggested as a means of integrating both perspectives on ‘relevance’ within a common evaluative framework.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 22

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Information behaviour: An interdisciplinary perspective

           T.D. WILSON (1997)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A re-examination of relevance: toward a dynamic, situational definition∗

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Psychological relevance and information science

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                April 1999
                April 1999
                : 1-15
                Affiliations
                Department of Information and Library Management, University of Northumbria

                Newcastle upon Tyne, England
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/MIRA1999.4
                © M. H. Heine et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. MIRA '99

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                MIRA '99
                MIRA
                Glasgow, Scotland
                14th - 16th April 1999
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                MIRA '99
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

                Comments

                Comment on this article