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      Spaces of Interaction

      , ,

      ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010 (VOCS)

      ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010

      14 - 16 April 2010

      Human-Computer Interaction, Interaction Design, Navigation of Information Space, gesture, emotion, presence, software architecture

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          Abstract

          As the world becomes increasingly computationally enabled, so our view of human-computer interaction (HCI) needs to evolve. The proliferation of wireless connectivity and mobile devices in all their various forms moves people from being outside a computer and interacting with it to being inside an information space and moving through it. Sensors on the body, wearable computers, wireless sensor networks, increasingly believable virtual characters and speech-based systems are all contributing to new interactive environments. New forms of interaction such as gesture and touch are rapidly emerging and interactions involving emotion and a real sense of presence are beginning. These are the new spaces of interaction we need to understand, design and engineer. Most importantly these new forms of interaction are fundamentally embodied. Older views of a disembodied cognition need to be replaced with an understanding of how people with bodies live in and move through spaces of interaction.

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          Most cited references 6

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          Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science

           Nigel Cross (2001)
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            The layers of presence: a bio-cultural approach to understanding presence in natural and mediated environments.

            This paper proposes a bio-cultural theory of presence based on four different positions related to the role and structure of presence, as follows. First, presence is a defining feature of self and it is related to the evolution of a key feature of any central nervous system: the embedding of sensory-referred properties into an internal functional space. Without the emergence of the sense of presence it is impossible for the nervous system to experience distal attribution: the referencing of our perception to an external space beyond the limits of the sensory organs themselves. Second, even if the experience of the sense of presence is a unitary feeling, conceptually it can be divided in three different layers, phylogenetically different and strictly related to the three levels of self identified by Damasio. In particular we can make conceptual distinctions between proto presence (self vs. non self), core presence (self vs. present external world), and extended presence (self relative to present external world). Third, given that each layer of presence solves a particular facet of the internal/external world separation, it is characterized by specific properties. Finally, in humans the sense of presence is a direct function of these three layers: the more they are integrated, the more we are present. In the experience of optimal presence, biologically and culturally determined cognitive processes are working in harmony--to focus all levels of the self on a significant situation in the external world, whether this is real or virtual.
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              Out of context: Computer systems that adapt to, and learn from, context

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                April 2010
                April 2010
                : 1-7
                Affiliations
                Centre for Interaction Design

                Edinburgh Napier University

                Edinburgh EH10 5 DT

                UK
                Swedish Institute of Computer Science

                Box 1263

                SE 1469 – SE Kista

                Sweden
                Laboratoire d’Informatique de Grenoble

                Bât. B Bureau 205 B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble

                France
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/VOCS2010.2
                © David Benyon et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010, The University of Edinburgh

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010
                VOCS
                The University of Edinburgh
                14 - 16 April 2010
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                ACM-BCS Visions of Computer Science 2010
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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