33
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      What types of interventions generate inequalities? Evidence from systematic reviews.

      Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
      Advertising as Topic, Developed Countries, Evidence-Based Practice, Health Behavior, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Public Health, Smoking, prevention & control, Socioeconomic Factors, Workplace

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Some effective public health interventions may increase inequalities by disproportionately benefiting less disadvantaged groups ('intervention-generated inequalities' or IGIs). There is a need to understand which types of interventions are likely to produce IGIs, and which can reduce inequalities. We conducted a rapid overview of systematic reviews to identify evidence on IGIs by socioeconomic status. We included any review of non-healthcare interventions in high-income countries presenting data on differential intervention effects on any health status or health behaviour outcome. Results were synthesised narratively. The following intervention types show some evidence of increasing inequalities (IGIs) between socioeconomic status groups: media campaigns; and workplace smoking bans. However, for many intervention types, data on potential IGIs are lacking. By contrast, the following show some evidence of reducing health inequalities: structural workplace interventions; provision of resources; and fiscal interventions, such as tobacco pricing. Our findings are consistent with the idea that 'downstream' preventive interventions are more likely to increase health inequalities than 'upstream' interventions. More consistent reporting of differential intervention effectiveness is required to help build the evidence base on IGIs.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Comments

          Comment on this article