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      Dorsal differentiation of neural plate cells induced by BMP-mediated signals from epidermal ectoderm

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      Cell

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          The cellular interactions that control the differentiation of dorsal cell types from neural progenitors have been examined in neural plate explants. Certain genes that are expressed in the dorsal neural tube are initially expressed uniformly within the neural plate and appear to achieve their dorsal restriction through a Sonic hedgehog (SHH)-mediated repressive signal from the notochord. The acquisition of definitive dorsal cell fates, however, requires a contact-dependent signal from the epidermal ectoderm. BMP4 and BMP7 are expressed in the epidermal ectoderm, and both proteins mimic its inductive activity. BMP4 and a related gene, DSL1, are subsequently expressed by cells in the dorsal neural tube. The differentiation of dorsal cell types, therefore, appears to be initiated at the neural plate stage and to involve the opponent activities of a BMP-mediated dorsalizing signal from the epidermal ectoderm and a SHH-mediated ventralizing signal from the notochord.

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          Most cited references33

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          A series of normal stages in the development of the chick embryo

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            A functionally conserved homolog of the Drosophila segment polarity gene hh is expressed in tissues with polarizing activity in zebrafish embryos.

            The segment polarity gene hedgehog (hh) encodes a novel signaling protein that mediates local cell-cell interactions in the developing Drosophila embryo. Here we describe the existence of an hh-related gene family in the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. One of these genes, sonic hedgehog (shh), is expressed in the notochord, floor plate, and posterior fin mesoderm, tissues associated with polarizing activities in various vertebrate embryos. The pattern of shh expression in zebra-fish mutants affecting axial structures, together with the consequences of its ectopic expression in normal embryos, is consistent with a role for shh in floor plate induction. By expressing shh in transgenic Drosophila embryos, we also demonstrate a strong functional conservation between the fish and fly hh genes.
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              Control of cell behavior during vertebrate development by Slug, a zinc finger gene.

              Slug, a vertebrate gene encoding a zinc finger protein of the Snail family, is expressed in the neural crest and in mesodermal cells emigrating from the primitive streak. Early chick embryos were incubated with antisense oligonucleotides to chick Slug. These oligonucleotides specifically inhibit the normal change in cell behavior that occurs at the two sites in the emerging body plan in which the gene is expressed. This change, which is the transition from epithelial to mesenchymal character, occurs at the formation of mesoderm during gastrulation and on emigration of the neutral crest from the neural tube.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cell
                Cell
                Elsevier BV
                00928674
                September 1995
                September 1995
                : 82
                : 6
                : 969-979
                Article
                10.1016/0092-8674(95)90276-7
                7553857
                02b9e94c-22df-4f65-a14a-64d6f0d6e5a2
                © 1995

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