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      Prediction of pain sensitivity in healthy volunteers

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate predictive parameters of the acute pain score during induction of an inflammatory heat injury.

          Patients and methods

          Healthy volunteers (50 females/50 males) were included in the study. The predictive potential of gender, anthropometric (body surface area, body mass index), psychological (anxiety, depression, vulnerability), and psychophysical (quantitative sensory testing, conditioned pain modulation) variables in estimating the pain response to a validated heat injury (47°C, 7 minutes, area 12.5 cm 2) were investigated. All assessments were made in duplicate sessions separated by 21 days (median).

          Results

          There were three main findings in this study. First, a predictive model of pain sensitivity during the heat injury, including both genders and using multiple regression technique, could account for 28% of the variance ( P < 0.0001), but gender-related differences in the final model could not be demonstrated. Second, the results confirmed significant gender-related differences in perception of electrical, pressure, and cold pressor stimuli ( P < 0.002). Third, positive correlations between anthropometric data and pain perception during electrical and pressure stimuli were demonstrated ( P < 0.001 and P < 0.005, respectively).

          Conclusion

          The study demonstrated predictability of acute pain sensitivity, and although gender-related differences in pain perception were demonstrated, no gender-related differences in pain sensitivity could be shown. Interestingly, positive correlations between anthropometric data and pain perception were shown for the first time.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Pain Res
          J Pain Res
          Journal of Pain Research
          Dove Medical Press
          1178-7090
          2012
          29 August 2012
          : 5
          : 313-326
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
          [2 ]Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Neuroscience Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
          [3 ]Department of Surgery, Koge Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Pernille Ravn, Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Copenhagen University, Universitetspatken 2, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark, Tel +45 2345 6283, Fax +45 3533 6050, Email ravn@ 123456farma.ku.dk
          Article
          jpr-5-313
          10.2147/JPR.S33925
          3442738
          23055774
          © 2012 Ravn et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

          Categories
          Original Research

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