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      The spatially resolved characterisation of Egyptian blue, Han blue and Han purple by photo-induced luminescence digital imaging.

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      Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry
      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          The photo-induced luminescence properties of Egyptian blue, Han blue and Han purple were investigated by means of near-infrared digital imaging. These pigments emit infrared radiation when excited in the visible range. The emission can be recorded by means of a modified commercial digital camera equipped with suitable glass filters. A variety of visible light sources were investigated to test their ability to excite luminescence in the pigments. Light-emitting diodes, which do not emit stray infrared radiation, proved an excellent source for the excitation of luminescence in all three compounds. In general, the use of visible radiation emitters with low emission in the infrared range allowed the presence of the pigments to be determined and their distribution to be spatially resolved. This qualitative imaging technique can be easily applied in situ for a rapid characterisation of materials. The results were compared to those for Egyptian green and for historical and modern blue pigments. Examples of the application of the technique on polychrome works of art are presented.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Anal Bioanal Chem
          Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry
          Springer Nature
          1618-2650
          1618-2642
          Jun 2009
          : 394
          : 4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] The British Museum, Great Russell Street, London, WC1B 3DG, UK. gverri@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk
          Article
          10.1007/s00216-009-2693-0
          19234690
          0bbc3395-66f0-438b-b74f-642b221b7fb9
          History

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