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      Views from Within a Narrative: Evaluating Long-Term Human–Robot Interaction in a Naturalistic Environment Using Open-Ended Scenarios

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          Abstract

          This article describes the prototyping of human–robot interactions in the University of Hertfordshire (UH) Robot House. Twelve participants took part in a long-term study in which they interacted with robots in the UH Robot House once a week for a period of 10 weeks. A prototyping method using the narrative framing technique allowed participants to engage with the robots in episodic interactions that were framed using narrative to convey the impression of a continuous long-term interaction. The goal was to examine how participants responded to the scenarios and the robots as well as specific robot behaviours, such as agent migration and expressive behaviours. Evaluation of the robots and the scenarios were elicited using several measures, including the standardised System Usability Scale, an ad hoc Scenario Acceptance Scale, as well as single-item Likert scales, open-ended questionnaire items and a debriefing interview. Results suggest that participants felt that the use of this prototyping technique allowed them insight into the use of the robot, and that they accepted the use of the robot within the scenario.

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          Most cited references 12

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          ‘It's just like you talk to a friend’ relational agents for older adults

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            Let's talk: anthropomorphization as means to cope with stress of interacting with technical devices.

            This study is concerned with the anthropomorphization of technical devices and the resulting influence on human-machine interaction; a special focus is on the verbal interaction between human and machine. Questions included: why do people regard technical devices as humans, when do they do so and how do they perceive their own dialogue and other persons' dialogues with technical devices? Correlation coefficients were calculated between the amount of displayed anthropomorphism and subjects' personality structure, fear of technical devices and self-rated technical competency. A subsequent regression analysis revealed that extraversion and gender of the respondents significantly predicted the amount of interaction with technical devices. Regression analysis showed that neuroticism and agreeableness significantly predicted self-rated technical competency. Technical devices that were seen as helpers or friends were generally treated less unfriendly than devices perceived as merely tools. The findings are discussed in the context of emotion and stress at work and the usability of technical devices.
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              Prototyping for usability of new technology

               ROGER R HALL (2001)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                d.s.syrdal@herts.ac.uk
                Journal
                Cognit Comput
                Cognit Comput
                Cognitive Computation
                Springer US (Boston )
                1866-9956
                1866-9964
                6 November 2014
                6 November 2014
                2014
                : 6
                : 4
                : 741-759
                Affiliations
                Adaptive Systems Research Group, School of Computer Science, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK
                Article
                9284
                10.1007/s12559-014-9284-x
                4255091
                25484992
                © The Author(s) 2014

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.

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                Article
                Custom metadata
                © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

                Neurosciences

                assistive robotics, prototyping, human–robot interaction

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