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      Inhaled corticosteroids for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5

      Cochrane Airways Group

      Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          The role of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been the subject of much controversy. Major international guidelines recommend selective use of ICS. Recently published meta-analyses have reported conflicting findings on the effects of inhaled steroid therapy in COPD. To determine the efficacy and safety of inhaled corticosteroids in stable patients with COPD, in terms of objective and subjective outcomes. A pre-defined search strategy was used to search the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register for relevant literature. Searches are current as of July 2011. We included randomised trials comparing any dose of any type of inhaled steroid with a placebo control in patients with COPD. Acute bronchodilator reversibility to short-term beta(2)-agonists and bronchial hyper-responsiveness were not exclusion criteria. The a priori primary outcome was change in lung function. We also analysed data on mortality, exacerbations, quality of life and symptoms, rescue bronchodilator use, exercise capacity, biomarkers and safety. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We collected adverse effects information from the trials. Fifty-five primary studies with 16,154 participants met the inclusion criteria. Long-term use of ICS (more than six months) did not consistently reduce the rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) in COPD patients (generic inverse variance analysis: mean difference (MD) 5.80 mL/year with ICS over placebo, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.28 to 11.88, 2333 participants; pooled means analysis: 6.88 mL/year, 95% CI 1.80 to 11.96, 4823 participants), although one major trial demonstrated a statistically significant difference. There was no statistically significant effect on mortality in COPD patients (odds ratio (OR) 0.98, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.16, 8390 participants). Long-term use of ICS reduced the mean rate of exacerbations in those studies where pooling of data was possible (generic inverse variance analysis: MD -0.26 exacerbations per patient per year, 95% CI -0.37 to -0.14, 2586 participants; pooled means analysis: MD -0.19 exacerbations per patient per year, 95% CI -0.30 to -0.08, 2253 participants). ICS slowed the rate of decline in quality of life, as measured by the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (MD -1.22 units/year, 95% CI -1.83 to -0.60, 2507 participants). Response to ICS was not predicted by oral steroid response, bronchodilator reversibility or bronchial hyper-responsiveness in COPD patients. There was an increased risk of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OR 2.65, 95% CI 2.03 to 3.46, 5586 participants) and hoarseness. In the long-term studies, the rate of pneumonia was increased in the ICS group compared to placebo, in studies that reported pneumonia as an adverse event (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.86, 6235 participants). The long-term studies that measured bone effects generally showed no major effect on fractures and bone mineral density over three years. Patients and clinicians should balance the potential benefits of inhaled steroids in COPD (reduced rate of exacerbations, reduced rate of decline in quality of life and possibly reduced rate of decline in FEV(1)) against the potential side effects (oropharyngeal candidiasis and hoarseness, and risk of pneumonia).

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          Most cited references 225

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          Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study of fluticasone propionate in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the ISOLDE trial.

          To determine the effect of long term inhaled corticosteroids on lung function, exacerbations, and health status in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Double blind, placebo controlled study. Eighteen UK hospitals. 751 men and women aged between 40 and 75 years with mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 50% of predicted normal. Inhaled fluticasone propionate 500 microgram twice daily from a metered dose inhaler or identical placebo. Efficacy measures: rate of decline in FEV(1) after the bronchodilator and in health status, frequency of exacerbations, respiratory withdrawals. Safety measures: morning serum cortisol concentration, incidence of adverse events. There was no significant difference in the annual rate of decline in FEV(1 )(P=0.16). Mean FEV(1) after bronchodilator remained significantly higher throughout the study with fluticasone propionate compared with placebo (P<0.001). Median exacerbation rate was reduced by 25% from 1.32 a year on placebo to 0.99 a year on with fluticasone propionate (P=0.026). Health status deteriorated by 3.2 units a year on placebo and 2.0 units a year on fluticasone propionate (P=0.0043). Withdrawals because of respiratory disease not related to malignancy were higher in the placebo group (25% v 19%, P=0.034). Fluticasone propionate 500 microgram twice daily did not affect the rate of decline in FEV(1) but did produce a small increase in FEV(1). Patients on fluticasone propionate had fewer exacerbations and a slower decline in health status. These improvements in clinical outcomes support the use of this treatment in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
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            Decreased histone deacetylase activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

            Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airway inflammation that is greater in patients with advanced disease. We asked whether there is a link between the severity of disease and the reduction in histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in the peripheral lung tissue of patients with COPD of varying severity. HDAC is a key molecule in the repression of production of proinflammatory cytokines in alveolar macrophages. HDAC activity and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity were determined in nuclear extracts of specimens of surgically resected lung tissue from nonsmokers without COPD, patients with COPD of varying severity, and patients with pneumonia or cystic fibrosis. Alveolar macrophages from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD and bronchial-biopsy specimens from nonsmokers, healthy smokers, patients with COPD, and those with mild asthma were also examined. Total RNA extracted from lung tissue and macrophages was used for quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assay of HDAC1 through HDAC8 and interleukin-8. Expression of HDAC2 protein was quantified with the use of Western blotting. Histone-4 acetylation at the interleukin-8 promoter was evaluated with the use of a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Specimens of lung tissue obtained from patients with increasing clinical stages of COPD had graded reductions in HDAC activity and increases in interleukin-8 messenger RNA (mRNA) and histone-4 acetylation at the interleukin-8 promoter. The mRNA expression of HDAC2, HDAC5, and HDAC8 and expression of the HDAC2 protein were also lower in patients with increasing severity of disease. HDAC activity was decreased in patients with COPD, as compared with normal subjects, in both the macrophages and biopsy specimens, with no changes in HAT activity, whereas HAT activity was increased in biopsy specimens obtained from patients with asthma. Neither HAT activity nor HDAC activity was changed in lung tissue from patients with cystic fibrosis or pneumonia. Patients with COPD have a progressive reduction in total HDAC activity that reflects the severity of the disease. Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.
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              Maintenance therapy with budesonide and formoterol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

              Lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be improved acutely by oral corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Whether clinical improvement can be maintained by subsequent inhaled therapy is unknown. COPD patients (n=1,022, mean prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 36% predicted) initially received formoterol (9 microg b.i.d.) and oral prednisolone (30 mg o.d.) for 2 weeks. After this time, patients were randomised to b.i.d. inhaled budesonide/formoterol 320/9 microg, budesonide 400 microg, formoterol 9 microg or placebo for 12 months. Postmedication FEV1 improved by 0.21 L and health-related quality of life using the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) by 4.5 units after run-in. Fewer patients receiving budesonide/formoterol withdrew from the study than those receiving budesonide, formoterol or placebo. Budesonide/formoterol patients had a prolonged time to first exacerbation (254 versus 96 days) and maintained higher FEV1 (99% versus 87% of baseline), both primary variables versus placebo. They had fewer exacerbations (1.38 versus 1.80 exacerbations per patient per year), had higher prebronchodilator peak expiratory flow, and showed clinically relevant improvements in SGRQ versus placebo (-7.5 units). Budesonide/formoterol was more effective than either monocomponent in both primary variables. Budesonide/formoterol in a single inhaler (Symbicort) maintains the benefit of treatment optimisation, stabilising lung function and delaying exacerbations more effectively than either component drug alone or placebo.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
                Wiley
                14651858
                July 11 2012
                Affiliations
                [1 ]The Prince Charles Hospital and The University of Queensland; Department of Thoracic Medicine and School of Medicine; 627 Rode Rd Chermside Brisbane Queensland Australia 4032
                [2 ]The Prince Charles Hospital; Thoracic Medicine Program; Brisbane Australia
                [3 ]Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital; Department of Medicine; Brisbane Australia
                [4 ]Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital; Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Care Services; Herston Road Herston Queensland Australia 4006
                [5 ]The Prince Charles Hospital; Department of Thoracic Medicine; Rode Road Brisbane Queensland Australia 4032
                Article
                10.1002/14651858.CD002991.pub3
                22786484
                © 2012
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