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      Detection of rhinovirus in induced sputum at exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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          Abstract

          Common colds are associated with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of the common cold virus (human rhinovirus) in the production of symptoms and lower airway inflammation at COPD exacerbation is unknown.

          Thirty three patients with moderate‐to‐severe COPD were seen at baseline, when the number of chest infections in the previous year was noted, and acutely at COPD exacerbation. Within 48 h after the onset of the exacerbation and at baseline, nasal aspirates and induced sputum were taken for rhinovirus reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) analysis and determination of cytokine levels. Symptoms, recorded on diary cards, were noted and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) measured.

          At exacerbation, mean FEV1 and FVC fell significantly from baseline (p<0.001). Ten of 43 exacerbations were associated with rhinovirus infection, detected in induced sputum. In four of these, nasophageal samples contained no detectable rhinovirus. All baseline samples were negative for rhinovirus. The simultaneous presence of increased nasal discharge/nasal congestion (in 26 of the 43 exacerbations) and increased sputum (29 exacerbations) was strongly associated with the presence of rhinovirus (odds ratio 6.15; p=0.036). Total symptom scores were greater for rhinovirus as compared to nonrhinovirus exacerbations (p=0.039). Median baseline sputum interleukin‐6 levels rose from 90.2 to 140.3 pg·mL ‐1 at exacerbation (p=0.005); the change was greater in the presence of rhinovirus infection (p=0.008).

          Rhinovirus infection can be detected at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. This is associated with elevation of lower airway interleukin‐6 levels, which may mediate lower airway symptom expression during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Eur Respir J
          Eur. Respir. J
          10.1111/(ISSN)1399-3003
          ERJ
          The European Respiratory Journal
          Munksgaard International Publishers (Sheffield )
          0903-1936
          1399-3003
          25 December 2001
          October 2000
          : 16
          : 4 ( doiID: 10.1111/erj.2000.16.issue-4 )
          : 677-683
          Affiliations
          [ 1 ]Academic Respiratory Medicine and
          [ 2 ]Virology, Dept of Medical Microbiology, St. Bartholomew′s and Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK.
          Article
          ERJ16D19
          10.1034/j.1399-3003.2000.16d19.x
          7163563
          11106212

          This article is being made freely available through PubMed Central as part of the COVID-19 public health emergency response. It can be used for unrestricted research re-use and analysis in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source, for the duration of the public health emergency.

          Page count
          links-crossref: 0, links-pubmed: 0, Figures: 1, Tables: 3, Equations: 0, References: 34, Words: 5426
          Categories
          Original Articles
          Custom metadata
          2.0
          October 2000
          Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_JATSPMC version:5.8.0 mode:remove_FC converted:15.04.2020

          Respiratory medicine

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