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      Systematic review of fertility-related psychological distress in cancer patients: Informing on an improved model of care

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          Most cited references61

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          Pretreatment fertility counseling and fertility preservation improve quality of life in reproductive age women with cancer.

          The post-treatment quality of life (QOL) impacts of receiving precancer-treatment infertility counseling and of pursuing fertility preservation have not been described in large-scale studies of reproductive age women with cancer. In total, 1041 women who were diagnosed between ages 18 and 40 years responded to a retrospective survey and reported whether they received infertility counseling before cancer treatment and whether they took action to preserve fertility. Five cancer types were included: leukemia, Hodgkin disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, and gastrointestinal cancer. Validated QOL scales were used: the Decision Regret Score, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and the brief World Health Organization QOL questionnaire. Overall, 560 women (61%) who received treatment that potentially could affect fertility were counseled by the oncology team, 45 (5%) were counseled by fertility specialists, and 36 (4%) took action to preserve fertility. Pretreatment infertility counseling by a fertility specialist and an oncologist resulted in lower regret than counseling by an oncologist alone (8.4 vs 11.0; P < .0001). The addition of fertility preservation (6.6 vs 11.0; P < .0001) also was associated with even lower regret scores than counseling by an oncologist alone. Further improvements also were observed in SWLS scores with the addition of fertility specialist counseling (23.0 vs 19.8; P = .09) or preserving fertility (24.0 vs 19.0; P = .05). Receiving specialized counseling about reproductive loss and pursuing fertility preservation is associated with less regret and greater QOL for survivors, yet few patients are exposed to this potential benefit. Women of reproductive age should have expert counseling and should be given the opportunity to make active decisions about preserving fertility. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.
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            Breast cancer in younger women: reproductive and late health effects of treatment.

            In 1997, we initiated a cohort study to evaluate quality of life (QOL) and reproductive health outcomes in younger female breast cancer survivors. Using listings from two tumor registries, we recruited women with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who were 50 years or younger at diagnosis and were also disease-free survivors for 2 to 10 years. A mailed survey questionnaire assessed medical and demographic factors, health-related QOL, mood, outlook on life, and reproductive health outcomes. We recruited 577 women, who ranged in age from 30 to 61.6 years (mean, 49.5 years) and were surveyed approximately 6 years after diagnosis. Almost three fourths had received some form of adjuvant therapy. Amenorrhea occurred frequently as a result of treatment in women > or = 40 years at diagnosis, and treatment-associated menopause was associated with poorer health perceptions. Across the cohort, physical functioning was quite good, but the youngest women experienced poorer mental health (P =.0002) and less vitality (energy; P =.03). Multiple regression analyses predicting QOL demonstrated better outcomes in African-American women, married or partnered women, and women with better emotional and physical functioning, whereas women who reported greater vulnerability had poorer QOL. Overall QOL in younger women who survive breast cancer is good, but there is evidence of increased emotional disruption, especially among the youngest women. Factors that may contribute to poorer health perceptions and QOL include experiencing a menopausal transition as part of therapy, and feeling more vulnerable after cancer.
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              Quality of life and sexual functioning in cervical cancer survivors.

              To compare quality of life and sexual functioning in cervical cancer survivors treated with either radical hysterectomy and lymph node dissection or radiotherapy. Women were interviewed at least 5 years after initial treatment for cervical cancer. Eligible women had squamous cell tumors smaller than 6 cm at diagnosis, were currently disease-free, and had either undergone surgery or radiotherapy, but not both. The two treatment groups were then compared using univariate analysis and multivariate linear regression with a control group of age- and race-matched women with no history of cancer. One hundred fourteen patients (37 surgery, 37 radiotherapy, 40 controls) were included for analysis. When compared with surgery patients and controls using univariate analysis, radiation patients had significantly poorer scores on standardized questionnaires measuring health-related quality of life (physical and mental health), psychosocial distress and sexual functioning. The disparity in sexual function remained significant in a multivariate analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses did not show significant differences between radical hysterectomy patients and controls on any of the outcome measures. Cervical cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy had worse sexual functioning than did those treated with radical hysterectomy and lymph node dissection. In contrast, these data suggest that cervical cancer survivors treated with surgery alone can expect overall quality of life and sexual function not unlike that of peers without a history of cancer.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psycho-Oncology
                Psycho-Oncology
                Wiley
                10579249
                January 2019
                January 2019
                November 20 2018
                : 28
                : 1
                : 22-30
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Women and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine; UNSW Sydney; Sydney Australia
                [2 ]Fertility & Research Centre; Royal Hospital for Women; Randwick Australia
                [3 ]Sydney Children's Hospital, Kids Cancer Centre; Sydney Australia
                [4 ]Translational Health Research Institute, School of Medicine; Western Sydney University; Sydney Australia
                [5 ]Psychosocial Health and Wellbeing (emPoWeR) Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women's Hospital; University of Melbourne; Melbourne Australia
                [6 ]Nelune Comprehensive Cancer Centre; Prince of Wales Hospital; Sydney Australia
                Article
                10.1002/pon.4927
                30460732
                2c1bc1d6-3ed3-4c34-a377-df03dd0b1892
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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