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      Y-shaped LVIS Stent-assisted Coiling of Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms: A Case Series

      1 , 2 , , 1

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      Cureus

      Cureus

      aneurysm, stent, lvis

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          Abstract

          Intracranial neurovascular stents are primarily used in stent-assisted coil embolization in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Recent studies suggest that a variety of these stents can be used for their flow diverting effects to obliterate intracranial aneurysms. In our series, we present two patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms who presented with recurrent aneurysm that was successfully treated with double Low Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Junior (LVIS Jr.) stent placement.

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          Most cited references 11

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          Pipeline for uncoilable or failed aneurysms: results from a multicenter clinical trial.

          To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED; ev3/Covidien, Irvine, Calif) in the treatment of complex intracranial aneurysms. The Pipeline for Uncoilable or Failed Aneurysms is a multicenter, prospective, interventional, single-arm trial of PED for the treatment of uncoilable or failed aneurysms of the internal carotid artery. Institutional review board approval of the HIPAA-compliant study protocol was obtained from each center. After providing informed consent, 108 patients with recently unruptured large and giant wide-necked aneurysms were enrolled in the study. The primary effectiveness endpoint was angiographic evaluation that demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion and absence of major stenosis at 180 days. The primary safety endpoint was occurrence of major ipsilateral stroke or neurologic death at 180 days. PED placement was technically successful in 107 of 108 patients (99.1%). Mean aneurysm size was 18.2 mm; 22 aneurysms (20.4%) were giant (>25 mm). Of the 106 aneurysms, 78 met the study's primary effectiveness endpoint (73.6%; 95% posterior probability interval: 64.4%-81.0%). Six of the 107 patients in the safety cohort experienced a major ipsilateral stroke or neurologic death (5.6%; 95% posterior probability interval: 2.6%-11.7%). PED offers a reasonably safe and effective treatment of large or giant intracranial internal carotid artery aneurysms, demonstrated by high rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and low rates of adverse neurologic events; even in aneurysms failing previous alternative treatments.
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            Stent-assisted coiling in endovascular treatment of 500 consecutive cerebral aneurysms with long-term follow-up.

            Stent-assisted coil embolization has become one of the most preferred techniques in the treatment of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms; however, long-term patency and safety of the self-expanding neurostents and their role in durability of the endovascular treatment has remained ambiguous. We sought to retrospectively examine the long-term results of self-expanding stent usage in conjunction with coil embolization in treatment of wide-neck cerebral aneurysms. We coiled 500 wide-neck cerebral aneurysms with different types of self-expanding neurostent assistance in 468 patients. Patient and aneurysm characteristics, pharmacologic therapy protocol, complications, and initial occlusion grades were analyzed. Patients underwent angiographic follow-up at 6 months to 7 years after treatment. DSA or MRA images of all patients were analyzed to assess the occlusion rate of aneurysms and patency of the parent artery. Enterprise (n = 340), Solitaire (n = 98), Wingspan (n = 41), LEO (n = 16), and Neuroform (n = 5) stent systems were used in this series. Stent-related thromboembolic events occurred in 21 patients and intraoperative rupture occurred in 4 patients. Initially, complete occlusion was achieved in 42.2% of the aneurysms, and, according to the last follow-up data, the rate had progressed to 90.8%. Recanalization rate at 6 months was 8%, whereas the late recanalization rate was 2%. The use of stents in endovascular treatment provides high rates of complete occlusion and low rates of recurrence at a long-term follow-up study.
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              The LVIS/LVIS Jr. stents in the treatment of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms: multicentre registry.

              Wide-necked intracranial aneurysms have been a challenge for endovascular techniques. With the advent of adjunctive devices such as balloons or stents, recanalisation rates have decreased secondary to better packing.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cureus
                Cureus
                2168-8184
                Cureus
                Cureus (Palo Alto (CA) )
                2168-8184
                19 March 2019
                March 2019
                : 11
                : 3
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Neurosurgery, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, USA
                [2 ] Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, USA
                Author notes
                Article
                10.7759/cureus.4271
                6529043
                Copyright © 2019, Zammar et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Funding
                GAM receives research fellowship support from Medtronic Inc., Neurovascular group.
                Categories
                Neurosurgery

                lvis, stent, aneurysm

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