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      Three dimensional optical angiography

      , , , , ,
      Optics Express
      The Optical Society

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          Abstract

          With existing optical imaging techniques three-dimensional (3-D) mapping of microvascular perfusion within tissue beds is severely limited by the efficient scattering and absorption of light by tissue. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method of optical angiography (OAG) that can generate 3-D angiograms within millimeter tissue depths by analyzing the endogenous optical scattering signal from an illuminated sample. The technique effectively separates the moving and static scattering elements within tissue to achieve high resolution images of blood flow, mapped into the 3-D optically sectioned tissue beds, at speeds that allow for perfusion assessment in vivo. Its development has its origin in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. We used OAG to visualize the cerebral microcirculation, of adult living mice through the intact cranium, measurements which would be difficult, if not impossible, with other optical imaging techniques.

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          Most cited references33

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          Optical coherence tomography - principles and applications

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            In vivo endoscopic optical biopsy with optical coherence tomography.

            Current medical imaging technologies allow visualization of tissue anatomy in the human body at resolutions ranging from 100 micrometers to 1 millimeter. These technologies are generally not sensitive enough to detect early-stage tissue abnormalities associated with diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis, which require micrometer-scale resolution. Here, optical coherence tomography was adapted to allow high-speed visualization of tissue in a living animal with a catheter-endoscope 1 millimeter in diameter. This method, referred to as "optical biopsy," was used to obtain cross-sectional images of the rabbit gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts at 10-micrometer resolution.
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              Microbubbles in medical imaging: current applications and future directions.

              R. Lindner (2004)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                OPEXFF
                Optics Express
                Opt. Express
                The Optical Society
                1094-4087
                2007
                2007
                April 02 2007
                April 02 2007
                : 15
                : 7
                : 4083
                Article
                10.1364/OE.15.004083
                19532651
                4890baf2-2adf-43f8-81f6-18c2f9d31d8c
                © 2007
                History

                Molecular medicine,Neurosciences
                Molecular medicine, Neurosciences

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