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      Silicon (Si) Supplementation Alleviates NaCl Toxicity in Mung Bean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] Through the Modifications of Physio-biochemical Attributes and Key Antioxidant Enzymes

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          Rapid determination of free proline for water-stress studies

          Plant and Soil, 39(1), 205-207
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            Silicon uptake and accumulation in higher plants.

            Silicon (Si) accumulation differs greatly between plant species because of differences in Si uptake by the roots. Recently, a gene encoding a Si uptake transporter in rice, a typical Si-accumulating plant, was isolated. The beneficial effects of Si are mainly associated with its high deposition in plant tissues, enhancing their strength and rigidity. However, Si might play an active role in enhancing host resistance to plant diseases by stimulating defense reaction mechanisms. Because many plants are not able to accumulate Si at high enough levels to be beneficial, genetically manipulating the Si uptake capacity of the root might help plants to accumulate more Si and, hence, improve their ability to overcome biotic and abiotic stresses.
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              SILICON.

              Silicon is present in plants in amounts equivalent to those of such macronutrient elements as calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus, and in grasses often at higher levels than any other inorganic constituent. Yet except for certain algae, including prominently the diatoms, and the Equisetaceae (horsetails or scouring rushes), it is not considered an essential element for plants. As a result it is routinely omitted from formulations of culture solutions and considered a nonentity in much of plant physiological research. But silicon-deprived plants grown in conventional nutrient solutions to which silicon has not been added are in many ways experimental artifacts. They are often structurally weaker than silicon-replete plants, abnormal in growth, development, viability, and reproduction, more susceptible to such abiotic stresses as metal toxicities, and easier prey to disease organisms and to herbivores ranging from phytophagous insects to mammals. Many of these same conditions afflict plants in silicon-poor soils-and there are such. Taken together, the evidence is overwhelming that silicon should be included among the elements having a major bearing on plant life.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                Journal of Plant Growth Regulation
                J Plant Growth Regul
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0721-7595
                1435-8107
                March 2019
                April 26 2018
                March 2019
                : 38
                : 1
                : 70-82
                Article
                10.1007/s00344-018-9810-2
                49407222-55cf-42a1-915e-3ca6165d1b42
                © 2019

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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