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      MAJOR FACTORS IMPEDING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT IN AUSTRALIAN CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

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          Abstract

          This article aims to identify barriers to implementing waste management practices in construction projects and their interrelationship, based on the particular context of Australia. Interviews and a questionnaire survey were conducted as the primary data collection methods supported by the findings of a charrette. The findings reveal twenty critical barriers to implementing waste management practices in Australian construction projects. Four underlying factors that impede waste management practices are extracted based on results of an exploratory factor analysis. These include rigidity of construction practices, construction project characteristics, awareness, experience and commitment, and the nascent nature of waste management. The study also finds that while both human factors and technical factors act as barriers to implementing waste management practices in Australian construction projects, human factors are more dominant. Thus, it is essential to address all these barriers in the early stage of construction projects for reducing waste generation.

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          Most cited references 48

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          Exploratory factor analysis: its role in item analysis.

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          The special characteristics of items-low reliability, confounds by minor, unwanted covariance, and the likelihood of a general factor-and better understanding of factor analysis means that the default procedure of many statistical packages (Little Jiffy) is no longer adequate for exploratory item factor analysis. It produces too many factors and precludes a general factor even when that means the factors extracted are nonreplicable. More appropriate procedures that reduce these problems are presented, along with how to select the sample, sample size required, and how to select items for scales. Proposed scales can be evaluated by their correlations with the factors; a new procedure for doing so eliminates the biased values produced by correlating them with either total or factor scores. The role of exploratory factor analysis relative to cluster analysis and confirmatory factor analysis is noted.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Summer 2018
                : 13
                : 3
                : 101-121
                Author notes

                1. School of Architecture and Built Environment, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20001, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia

                2. School of Architecture & Built Environment; Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation and Innovation Centre (ECIC), The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia

                (corresponding author Jian.Zuo@ 123456adelaide.edu.au )

                3. School of Human Health and Social Sciences, CQ University Adelaide, 44, Greenhill Road, Wayville, SA 5034, Australia

                4. School of Management, Guangzhou University, Guangdong, P.R.China

                5. School of Architecture and Built Environment, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia

                6. School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471 Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia

                Article
                jgb.13.3.101
                10.3992/1943-4618.13.3.101
                © 2018 College Publishing
                Page count
                Pages: 21
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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