1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Effects of stress on the gonadal function

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 72

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Menstrual cycles: fatness as a determinant of minimum weight for height necessary for their maintenance or onset.

          Weight loss causes loss of menstrual function (amenorrhea) and weight gain restores menstrual cycles. A minimal weight for height necessary for the onset of or the restoration of menstrual cycles in cases of primary or secondary amenorrhea due to undernutrition is indicated by an index of fatness of normal girls at menarche and at age 18 years, respectively. Amenorrheic patients of ages 16 years and over resume menstrual cycles after weight gain at a heavier weight for a particular height than is found at menarche. Girls become relatively and absolutely fatter from menarche to age 18 years. The data suggest that a minimum level of stored, easily mobilized energy is necessary for ovulation and menstrual cycles in the human female.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            beta-Endorphin and adrenocorticotropin are selected concomitantly by the pituitary gland.

            The opiate-like peptide beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropin are concomitantly secreted in increased amounts by the adenohypophysis in response to acute stress or long-term adrenalectomy as well as in vitro in response to purified corticotropin releasing factor and other secretagogues. Conversely, administration of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone inhibits the secretion of both adrenocorticotropin and beta-endorphin. Thus, both hormones possess common and identical regulatory mechanisms and there may be a functional role for circulating beta-endorphin.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Plasma testosterone and progesterone titers of pregnant rats, their male and female fetuses, and neonatal offspring.

               Naomi Ward,  J Weisz (1979)
              Testosterone and progesterone titers were determined by RIA in the plasma of pregnant rats and their male and female fetuses from day 17 of gestation through the day of birth and in male and female neonates on days 3 and 5 post partum. Males had significantly higher mean testosterone levels than females from day 18 of gestation through day 5 post partum. Sex differences in plasma testosterone concentrations were greatest in the fetuses on days 18 and 19 of gestation when testosterone levels peaked in the males. Instances in which female fetuses had testosterone titers equal to or greater than their male littermates were found on every day of gestation except day 18. Mean testosterone concentrations in plasma of female fetuses were high throughout gestation (greater than 1000 pcg/ml). Testosterone concentrations decreased in both sexes after birth. Differences between the sexes remained significant, and although there was an overlap in the values for males and females, testosterone concentrations in females exceeded those of their male littermates in only one out of nine pairs of samples on day 5 and in none of seven pairs on day 3 post partum. There were no significant differences in progesterone levels in plasma of males and females, either pre- or postnatally. Progesterone titers changed as a function of days post conception in both the fetuses and their mothers. In the fetuses, progesterone levels declined progressively from day 18 post conception through the day of birth, while in the mother they rose from days 18 to 19 then declined between days 20 and 21 of pregnancy. Fetuses had lower progesterone titers than their mothers. From these data, we conclude that day 18 and possibly day 19 post conception represent a critical period during which the central nervous system of the male is primed by high levels of testosterone. Thereafter, the process of masculinization is completed by exposure to testosterone levels that are relatively low and need not be consistently higher than those of female littermates.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Endocrinological Investigation
                J Endocrinol Invest
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0391-4097
                1720-8386
                October 1984
                April 4 2014
                October 1984
                : 7
                : 5
                : 529-537
                Article
                10.1007/BF03348463
                © 1984

                Comments

                Comment on this article