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      Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes in HIV-positive patients on antiretroviral therapy.

      Journal of Clinical Microbiology

      AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections, diagnosis, epidemiology, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child, Preschool, China, Coinfection, Cryptosporidiosis, Cryptosporidium, classification, genetics, DNA, Ribosomal Spacer, Enterocytozoon, Female, Genotype, HIV Infections, drug therapy, microbiology, parasitology, HIV-1, Humans, Infant, Male, Microsporidiosis, Middle Aged, Molecular Sequence Data, Phylogeny, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Young Adult

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          Abstract

          Molecular diagnostic tools have been used increasingly in the characterization of the transmission of cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis in developing countries. However, few studies have examined the distribution of Cryptosporidium species and Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes in AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. In the present study, 683 HIV-positive patients in the National Free Antiretroviral Therapy Program in China and 683 matched HIV-negative controls were enrolled. Cryptosporidium species and subtypes and Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes were detected and differentiated by PCR and DNA sequencing. The infection rates were 1.5% and 0.15% for Cryptosporidium and 5.7% and 4.2% for E. bieneusi in HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants, respectively. The majority (8/11) of Cryptosporidium cases were infections by zoonotic species, including Cryptosporidium meleagridis (5), Cryptosporidium parvum (2), and Cryptosporidium suis (1). Prevalent E. bieneusi genotypes detected, including EbpC (39), D (12), and type IV (7), were also potentially zoonotic. The common occurrence of EbpC was a feature of E. bieneusi transmission not seen in other areas. Contact with animals was a risk factor for both cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis. The results suggest that zoonotic transmission was significant in the epidemiology of both diseases in rural AIDS patients in China.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          23224097
          3553929
          10.1128/JCM.02758-12

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