Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Improving the utilization of essential public health services by Chinese elderly migrants: strategies and policy implication

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          The concept of healthy aging has become a global health strategy in response to the population aging. In China, old-aged migrants are facing serious health care challenges due to the obstacles in the utilization of health services, social integration and ignored public policies. We aimed to examine the old-aged migrants’ utilization of the essential public health services and its underlying factors on account of change of residence, and social support.

          Methods

          Data came from the senior sample (aged over 65 years, n = 11 161) of the 2015 National Migrant Dynamic Monitoring Survey in China that employed Probability Proportionate to Size method as a sampling strategy. χ 2 tests and binary multilevel model were conducted to analyze the difference and the underlying factors of the utilization of essential health services among old-aged migrants.

          Results

          Approximately 66.2% of old-aged migrants did not receive free physician examination services from health institutions in the past year, and 34.6% of old-aged migrants with chronic disease have been followed up by doctors. There were significant differences in the utilization of essential public health services among old-aged migrants across different individuals and families. It showed that exercise time, migrating range, migrating reason, physical health condition, chronic disease, local friends, health insurance, household expenditure, and income were significantly associated with the elderly migrants’ utilization of essential public health services.

          Conclusions

          The utilization of essential public health services among old-aged migrants was insufficient in comparison with the general population. The government should launch targeted policies such as production and work-related injuries for the floating population. The supply side should promote the equalization of essential public health services for migrants. Social organizations and community should undertake the responsibility in social support for old-aged migrants.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Urbanisation and health in China

          Summary China has seen the largest human migration in history, and the country's rapid urbanisation has important consequences for public health. A provincial analysis of its urbanisation trends shows shifting and accelerating rural-to-urban migration across the country and accompanying rapid increases in city size and population. The growing disease burden in urban areas attributable to nutrition and lifestyle choices is a major public health challenge, as are troubling disparities in health-care access, vaccination coverage, and accidents and injuries in China's rural-to-urban migrant population. Urban environmental quality, including air and water pollution, contributes to disease both in urban and in rural areas, and traffic-related accidents pose a major public health threat as the country becomes increasingly motorised. To address the health challenges and maximise the benefits that accompany this rapid urbanisation, innovative health policies focused on the needs of migrants and research that could close knowledge gaps on urban population exposures are needed.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Chronic disease prevalence and care among the elderly in urban and rural Beijing, China - a 10/66 Dementia Research Group cross-sectional survey

            Background Demographic ageing is occurring at an unprecedented rate in China. Chronic diseases and their disabling consequences will become much more common. Public policy has a strong urban bias, and older people living in rural areas may be especially vulnerable due to limited access to good quality healthcare, and low pension coverage. We aim to compare the sociodemographic and health characteristics, health service utilization, needs for care and informal care arrangements of representative samples of older people in two Beijing communities, urban Xicheng and rural Daxing. Methods A one-phase cross-sectional survey of all those aged 65 years and over was conducted in urban and rural catchment areas in Beijing, China. Assessments included questionnaires, a clinical interview, physical examination, and an informant interview. Prevalence of chronic diseases, self-reported impairments and risk behaviours was calculated adjusting for household clustering. Poisson working models were used to estimate the independent effect of rural versus urban residence, and to explore the predictors of health services utilization. Results We interviewed 1002 participants in rural Daxing, and 1160 in urban Xicheng. Those in Daxing were more likely to be younger, widowed, less educated, not receiving a pension, and reliant on family transfers. Chronic diseases were more common in Xicheng, when based on self-report rather than clinical assessment. Risk exposures were more common in Daxing. Rural older people were much less likely to access health services, controlling for age and health. Community health services were ineffective, particularly in Daxing, where fewer than 3% of those with hypertension were adequately controlled. In Daxing, care was provided by family, who had often given up work to do so. In Xicheng, 45% of those needing care were supported by paid caregivers. Caregiver strain was higher in Xicheng. Dementia was strongly associated with care needs and caregiver strain, but not with medical helpseeking. Conclusion Apparent better health in Daxing might be explained by under-diagnosis, under-reporting or selective mortality. Far-reaching structural reforms may be needed to improve access and strengthen rural healthcare. The impact of social and economic change is already apparent in Xicheng, with important implications for future long-term care.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Perceived discrimination and depression among new migrants to Hong Kong: the moderating role of social support and neighborhood collective efficacy.

               Kee-Lee Chou (2012)
              Although it is well known that perceived discrimination is a risk factor contributing to depressive symptoms among immigrants, most previous studies (1) did not distinguish between discrimination based on immigrant status and race and (2) used cross-sectional data. To address these limitations, the present study examined whether perceived discrimination affects depressive symptomatology in a representative sample of newly arrived immigrants from Mainland China to Hong Kong using longitudinal data over a period of one year. A representative sample of 347 migrants aged 18 and older were interviewed face to face in 2007 and 2008. The 20-item Center for Epidemiology Studies of Depression (CES-D) scale was used to measure depressive symptoms and a series of sociodemographic questions (age, gender, marital status, education, and personal income), stress due to perceived discrimination, social support, and neighborhood collective efficacy were also included. Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with depressive symptoms one year later, after adjusting for depressive symptoms at baseline assessment, sociodemographic characteristics, social support, and neighborhood collective efficacy. Moreover, both social support and neighborhood collective efficacy moderated the effect of perceived discrimination on depressive symptoms. Perceived discrimination is a common experience for new Mainland immigrants to Hong Kong, and it predicts depressive symptoms. Therefore, interventions that reduce discrimination and strengthen social support and neighborhood collective efficacy should be designed and implemented to improve the mental health of new immigrants in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Glob Health
                J Glob Health
                JGH
                Journal of Global Health
                International Society of Global Health
                2047-2978
                2047-2986
                June 2020
                30 March 2020
                : 10
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Medicine and Health Management, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
                [2 ]Research Institute of Rehabilitation Information, China Rehabilitation Science Institute, Beijing, China
                [3 ]School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
                Author notes
                [*]

                Contributed equally to this work.

                Correspondence to:
Chengxu Long
School of Medicine and Health Management
Tongji Medical College
Huazhong University of Science and Technology
13 Hangkong Road
Qiaokou District
Wuhan, Hubei
China
 longchengxu@ 123456hust.edu.cn 
Zhanchun Feng
School of Medicine and Health Management
Tongji Medical College
Huazhong University of Science and Technology
13 Hangkong Road
Qiaokou District
Wuhan, Hubei
China
 zcfeng@ 123456hust.edu.cn
                Article
                jogh-10-010807
                10.7189/jogh.10.010807
                7125420
                Copyright © 2020 by the Journal of Global Health. All rights reserved.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 4, Equations: 0, References: 40, Pages: 11
                Categories
                Research Theme 4: Health Transitions in China

                Public health

                Comments

                Comment on this article