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      Bridging the Gap Between Prevention Research and Practice: The Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation

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          Abstract

          If we keep on doing what we have been doing, we are going to keep on getting what we have been getting. Concerns about the gap between science and practice are longstanding. There is a need for new approaches to supplement the existing approaches of research to practice models and the evolving community-centered models for bridging this gap. In this article, we present the Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation (ISF) that uses aspects of research to practice models and of community-centered models. The framework presents three systems: the Prevention Synthesis and Translation System (which distills information about innovations and translates it into user-friendly formats); the Prevention Support System (which provides training, technical assistance or other support to users in the field); and the Prevention Delivery System (which implements innovations in the world of practice). The framework is intended to be used by different types of stakeholders (e.g., funders, practitioners, researchers) who can use it to see prevention not only through the lens of their own needs and perspectives, but also as a way to better understand the needs of other stakeholders and systems. It provides a heuristic for understanding the needs, barriers, and resources of the different systems, as well as a structure for summarizing existing research and for illuminating priority areas for new research and action.

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          Most cited references67

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              The new frontier for prevention research involves building a scientific knowledge base on how to disseminate and implement effective prevention programs with fidelity. Toward this end, a brief overview of findings from the Blueprints for Violence Prevention-Replication Initiative is presented, identifying factors that enhance or impede a successful implementation of these programs. Findings are organized around five implementation tasks: site selection, training, technical assistance, fidelity, and sustainability. Overall, careful attention to each of these tasks, together with an independent monitoring of fidelity, produced a successful implementation with high fidelity and sustainability. A discussion of how these findings inform the present local adaptation-fidelity debate follows.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                American Journal of Community Psychology
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                00910562
                June 2008
                June 2008
                February 27 2008
                : 41
                : 3-4
                : 171-181
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychology; University of South Carolina; 29208 Columbia SC USA
                [2 ]Miami University; Oxford USA
                [3 ]Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Atlanta USA
                [4 ]Georgia Division of Public Health; Atlanta USA
                Article
                10.1007/s10464-008-9174-z
                18302018
                755ceb28-3dfa-439b-9866-12e2b27ebf67
                © 2008

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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